May 28, 2008

What personality do you need to succeed in Silicon Valley

Here’s another awesome comment I thought I’d feature:

Home sales jump 29% in the San Francisco Bay Area [Burbed.com]
fremontrenter Says:
May 23rd, 2008 at 5:30 pm

I think I agree with bob 100%. I think to live and survive in BA, one requires a different mentality. These are the type A personalities who treat life as a running race with no end line. It’s all about keeping on running. Good for them. I personally tend to enjoy smaller things in life. If you belong to this class and ready to devote all your life for working, stay in BA. I’ll quote something I read on internet. BA is about overoworking to facilitate overspending to facilitate overconsumption. I guess one aught to be like a machine to think this way.

Especially, when it comes to the schooling, California is about the worst one can get. State has no money to fund it. The tax money goes to all those who benefit from prop 13. As a new comer you are at a disadvantage from the get go. Add to that the income tax. It make you participate in a orgy of financial overcommittment. Becuase even if you don’t buy a home, you pay tax. So the state wants you to buy a house and save on taxes. That raises the demand and housing becomes unaffordable.

That in itself is further proof that Silicon Valley is the place to be if you want to become rich and successful. Sure you might be earning $300k (standard married couple income) a year, but spending $400k a year to have the same quality of life here as someone making $300k in a crappy place like New York, New Jersey, or Connecticut, but at least you have great company.

And isn’t that what life is about? Being surrounded by people who share your values? Who share your interests?

Why would you want to live somewhere full of boring, lazy people?

If fremontrenter’s comment isn’t the biggest case for why you should live here, I don’t know what is.

Comments (43) -- Posted by: burbed @ 4:41 am

43 Responses to “What personality do you need to succeed in Silicon Valley”

  1. nomadic Says:

    I can see what you’re saying, but the irony is that I have learned the complete opposite since moving to the Bay Area seven years ago. I had NEVER met anyone who quit their job to take a year or so off before moving here. I personally worked more when living in the midwest and never enjoyed the outdoors. People have a more active life here, and I think they enjoy life more in general.

    BTW, I did NOT want to move out here originally. Between the left-leaning politics and ridiculous taxes, I didn’t think it would be tolerable. But that’s the beauty of our country – if you don’t like it somewhere you can always move on. We decided to try it out for a couple of years; now we choose to stay.

  2. buckborden Says:

    Fremontrenter says: I think to live and survive in BA, one requires a different mentality.

    Hmm, am I missing something here? Just what sort of mentality do you mean? Are you telling me that living and surviving on less than $60K a year, which I have throughout my lifelong residency, somehow means I’m not fit? That I have a personality disorder because I don’t need to chase materialism and that somehow that means I don’t belong here because I’m not ruthlessly aggressive when it comes to chasing money and the phony American dream? Am I missing your point? I don’t understand.

  3. madhaus aka guitar hero Says:

    I agree with nomadic. Both mr and mrs madhaus have taken huge chunks of time, as in years, out of the work rat-race because the huge stock options allowed that. This meant lots of quality time with the kids when they were small.

    We know many other families who have done the same thing. How much would this fly for men in the midwest or the east?

  4. fremontrenter aka austindweller Says:

    >>Are you telling me that living and surviving on less than $60K a year, which I have throughout my lifelong residency, somehow means I’m not fit?

    Question is are you happy with what you get back, in terms of quality of life and standard of living that you get in 60k in BA ? If the answer is yes then what I think does not matter. For me the standard of living for 250k that you keep mentioning is not worth $150k standard of living in south. Plus the fact that I’ll not risk everything I got for a shack in good school district means that I’ll be renting 1000 sqft apartment all my days in BA. It’s not fun when you realize that you kids don’t have enough space. IMO, there is no way without playing the risky housing market game and have a better standard of life at the same time in BA. The absolute losses I might incur in playing this game outweigh my risk taking potential.

    Plus I have already pointed out numerous difference in our family situation. You don’t give a damn about the schools, because I have already passed that stage. If I were alone by myself, even 60k I wouldn’t mind. My personal needs are not that big. I till drive a 10 yr old honda. When it comes to kids, I want to provide them the best possible. I grew up as a poor kid, so I know how hard it is to make good in life when you don’t have the best resources. Keep mentioning my 250k in all your posts, but keep in mind it’s nothing when you want to bring up your family in BA.

  5. fremontrenter aka austindweller Says:

    >> Both mr and mrs madhaus have taken huge chunks of time, as in years, out of the work rat-race because the huge stock options allowed that.

    Great for you madhaus. But, do you realize for every one of you there are thousands who were not that lucky or never had those kind of options. My life the way I think is not the pursuit of being lucky and most probably failing as the rule of probabilities, based on probability of hitting a lottery, dictates. My life is pursuit of steady income to support my family, have a decent standard of living, give the best to my kids and retire safely with no surprises.

  6. austindweller aka fremontrenter Says:

    >>You don’t give a damn about the schools, because I have already passed that stage

    Damn, should proof read it. You don’t give a damn about the schools, because you have already passed that stage

    > I till drive a 10 yr old honda.

    I still drive a 10 yr old honda.

  7. bob Says:

    I agree with nomadic. Both mr and mrs madhaus have taken huge chunks of time, as in years, out of the work rat-race because the huge stock options allowed that. This meant lots of quality time with the kids when they were small.”

    Congrats. You now might have a somewhat similar lifestyle to my parents. Except they didn’t play the rat-race game at all, have zero debt, loads of retirement, took me and my Brother on vacations and the whole nine yards, and did so with regular jobs that allowed them to be home before 4:00. My mom is a teacher, so she was home by 3:00. What’s more is that they own 18 acres and are near an excellent school district. No crazy stock option lottery ticket required. b-b-b-but it ISN’T in the BA! Oh no!

    The point being made is that I can guarantee that my parents live better than most of the so-called super rich in the BA. What passes as wealth here is really what I think is more like a ho-him middle class existence elsewhere. The fact that in order to gain a stable middle class lifestyle requires cash-out stock options and super-high salaries is kind of sad and not at all indicative of wealth if compared nationally.

  8. buckborden Says:

    I’m sorry, but $250K is insane wealth, regardless of how big your family is. If that does not provide you with a comfortable life ANYWHERE regardless of housing prices and schools, then your problems are insurmountable. You will never find happiness if you define it in monetary terms.

  9. burbed Says:

    But your parents don’t live in 2008 Silicon Valley. So their lives have no meaning.

    Besides, everyone gets rich from stock options around here.

    Well. Everyone who should own a home.

  10. buckborden Says:

    Bob says: The fact that in order to gain a stable middle class lifestyle requires cash-out stock options and super-high salaries.

    Oh, really? And exactly what is a “stable, middle class lifestyle”? Are you to tell me that because I choose not to buy into the nonsense on my mere $40K salary that I am not middle class or stable? Excuse me, but I love my boring, zero debt, zero tax hassles, zero kids, tons of friends, lifestyle. Hassles of wealth and chasing some ill-defined dream of the perfect life, just to say I live in the Bay Area and can show off to my friends about how “successful” I am? No, thanks, friend. I have an embarrassment of riches by living simply and frugally, even here in the Bay Area, and I hardly consider myself poor, even with my $800 a week job. Some of us do not need tons of money or debt for a house to define our self-worth. My “house” is in good order, thank you very much. How’s yours?

  11. bob Says:

    buckborden,
    I wasn’t trying to pinpoint specifics. I was just making a comparison. My folks make less than 80k combined. They aren’t big spenders, but they don’t scrimp either. As in my Mom has a 2007 Honda CRV, and Dad has a newer Toyota truck. They travel to Europe,various exotic Mediterranean coastal cities, own a boat and a camper, have a small plot near the lake, and also own a rental house. I’d say that in reality, they probably live closer to an upper middle class lifestyle.

    Yet 70k in the BA gets you rent, a used car every 5-10 years and a bit leftover for retirement. I’m in no way putting anyone down for living as you do. I live the same way. But the fact is that middle class here doesn’t equate to middle class elsewhere.

    In order to live like my Parents do in the BA, you’d probably have to be swinging a 500k+ a year job. This sort of comparison is seldom mentioned by people, but that’s the truth of it, which is that beyond just the raw cost of housing, the general cost of living in the BA is many times more than most other places, and the wages do not come close to enabling any kind of reduction of this delta.Simply put- you have to pay more, make more, and work more to get less.

    You’ve said yourself that you plan on moving to Oregon ( which is what 90% of all Californians I ever meet want to do) so it is obvious that you do not see the ‘value’ here and comprehend the ability of the California dollar to go much further elsewhere. I commend you for that. I’m doing precisely the same. If more people lived like us, saved, lived frugally, and knew what could be had beyond the limited scope of the BA, the US financial situation would be in far better shape.

    So I wasn’t trying to put anyone down. Just making a casual observation.

  12. madhaus aka guitar hero Says:

    I actually agree with most of what is being said here by various people who think they are disagreeing with each other. The amount of money you need to live what would be a middle-class existence in most of the rest of the country is mind-boggling. It’s easier if you already bought in, like we did, in 1993, and even then we were both prepared and lucky. We had saved for a downpayment, and then got unexpected money from deceased grandparents. That allowed us to look in a better neighborhood than others making what we did. And 1993 was a pretty good time to be looking, things were flat, few other buyers competing and bidding up prices, etc. I am not in any way suggesting that because we swung a house in a decent neighborhood then so should everyone else — it is clear we were quite fortunate in both timing and some bonus cash.

    What we’ve done since then was be careful. We’ve refinanced a few times to bring down the loan amount and the rate, and now have more than 80% equity in the house. Every house on the block could foreclose and we’d still be fine. I have no respect for the people who used their house like an ATM and are now underwater. There’s a story almost every day like that on irvinehousingblog. I do feel for the folks who bought after 2004 using a ninja loan, because that was the only way to own a house. That’s going to hurt.

    fremontrenter, I’m not trying to hit it lucky with the options. We just called the peak when others didn’t and cashed out in September, 2000. Those that didn’t lost it all the following month. And we’re going about our life without flash, but we’re comfortable. But tell me, why weren’t you willing to rent a house so your kids could have space and their own yard? I hate apartments and always rented houses here, even when I was single.

    buckborden, yes, your parents are living upper-middle class with those vacations every year. But given their jobs it reminds me of something I heard about Palo Alto back in the late 1980s:

    – If you bought here 40 years ago, you’re a teacher
    – If you bought here 30 years ago, you’re an engineer
    – If you bought here 20 years ago, you’re a doctor
    – If you bought here 10 years ago, you’re a lawyer
    – If you’re buying here now, you’re a CEO

    There is no way that teachers can lead the life your parents have now. Wages depressed in the 1970s due to stagflation, and led to the two-income family becoming the norm; it’s not really clear which one came before the other. I’d bet many of us (who grew up in the US) had better standards of living on one income then many can find in the RBA, or any of the expensive metro areas, on two.

  13. austindweller aka fremontrenter Says:

    >>But tell me, why weren’t you willing to rent a house so your kids could have space and their own yard?

    For a house that I really like to rent, the rent would have been something close to $3000 a month. That’s after tax. Even after paying so much, the schools are not exemplary compared to the others in the nation. Plus I already hit 33% fed tax bracket and 10% CA tax bracket approx. That would mean a hugh expense. Plus the commute for me and my spouse was getting to be too much. Plus my job was quite demanding in the first year. My spouse wanted a house and that would’ve meant making that committment. Moreover, I am not sure how long it will take for RE to decline to what I call sensible. I am not sure even whether it will. There are too many who want to committ for their life to live in BA. And what do I achieve after working hard and staying in BA ? Though I like the natural beauty nearby, I was unable to spend time there due to work. even after moving out, I can always take vactions there. So all in all, moving out to a cheaper affordable place was the best option.

  14. Crossroads Says:

    has anyone thought about moving to NJ?

    the more i read here, the better it seems to move to somewhere cheap like that with good schools.

  15. mrbogue Says:

    about NJ… i’ve got some buddies over there @ comcast. they seem to be pretty well to do and from what I hear they have alot of jobs out there. Scraping ice off of my car in the morning scares the hell out of me though, but thats just me.

  16. bob Says:

    Well,
    Seeing as how NJ is right up there with MA in terms of losing population due to the cost of living and high taxes ( MA has lost 5% of its population since 2000) I’m not sure if I’d ever consider it. That and it simply gets too cold up there. I’m ok with say- 35-40 degrees. But -10 is a bit much.

  17. burbed Says:

    -10? New Jersey? Uh.

    http://www.weather.com/weather/wxclimatology/monthly/graph/USNJ0364?from=36hr_bottomnav_undeclared

    Apparently the record low was -4.

    FWIW, the Bay Area in 2006 had 2.5% more people than it did in 2000. Not exactly blockbuster growth either.

    Crossroads, did you ever see this entry?

    http://www.burbed.com/2007/11/02/new-jersey-is-expensive-to-live-in-bs-tenaflys-high-schools-and-house-prices/

    New Jersey can pretend it’s expensive – but we’ve got them beat. Between their crazy cheap gas, and their sales tax free clothes, and their lower income tax – I don’t know how they can make those claims.

  18. Pralay Says:

    FWIW, the Bay Area in 2006 had 2.5% more people than it did in 2000. Not exactly blockbuster growth either.
    ———

    Is it real census number or just estimate? In any case it does not come anywhere near 12% growth between 1990 to 2000.

  19. burbed Says:

    I looked at data here:

    http://www.bayareacensus.ca.gov/counties/SantaClaraCounty.htm

  20. bob Says:

    All I know is that the City-data.com forums are crammed full of NJ refugees wanting to get the absolute hell out of there.That and people from MA, MI, and FL. From what they say, the taxes eat them alive and it is expensive due to its approximation to NYC and the insane commutes people are willing to drive in order to live in NJ and work in NYC. Thus the price of housing is fairly high. High as in you’ll probably be shelling out 350-400k for something decent. “cheap” compared to SF… but not what I personally consider cheap. The cheapest thing I could find was this shack:

    http://newjersey.craigslist.org/rfs/700062325.html

    -That would get you a pretty damned nice house where I’m from.

    I had a friend who used to live there. 4 hour commutes weren’t at all unusual. Anyhow, not exactly my cup of tea, but the initial consensus is that yup- it is cheaper than SF… but so is the rest of the entire country.

  21. burbed Says:

    All I know is that the City-data.com forums are crammed full of NJ refugees wanting to get the absolute hell out of there.

    Oh I see the disconnect. They don’t have Prop 13 in New Jersey – so the property taxes are always going up.

    On the other hand, they amazing schools. I wonder if there’s some sort of connection there.

    I think most people in Northern New Jersey take mass transit to work in Manhattan. I think all of Manhattan would have to be a giant parking tower to fit all the cars otherwise.

  22. bob Says:

    Another thing about growth in the BA… I hate to bring up the white elephant in the corner, but how much of that growth is inward domestic growth versus uneducated illegal immigrants from across the border? Not trying to make this out to be anything other than comparing the amount of educated people moving out versus uneducated people moving in. Not really what I would call a healthy pattern.

  23. bob Says:

    hmmm… No prop 13 and better schools? you have to wonder…
    -course we can’t mention removing prop 13 here. That’s a sure-fire way to not get re-elected.

  24. bob Says:

    Here’s some posts from just the Raleigh Durahm city_data site. All people from NJ:

    -“Like many other people me and my fiancee are thinking of a relocation due to high taxes and home prices in NJ.”

    -“we moved here from NJ. we have no family here, but with cc debt and the cost of living which made that debt, we cld no longer stay there. we were both working, just had a baby, he worked nights i worked days, never saw each other…
    we tried to make it work for almost 10 years to fight through it, but it became a losing battle for us.”

    -“My wife and I are really considering moving this year and getting away from the high cost, small tiny lots, fast paced, long commutes, long cold winter days environment and highly considering Raleigh (since my company has an office there and I can easily get a transfer).”

    -“I currently live in NJ, about 15 minutes from Philadelphia, and where I live everything is so overpriced and just plain crowded everywhere. Its pretty overwhelming at times!”

    - “I’m kind of interested in the Raleigh NC area. My best friend will be relocating late this year as well and is going to the triangle area. I can’t wait that long to go since I have a child who will be in school. I’m sick of NJ as is my 11yr old.”

    Anyhow, you get the drift. There were PAGES of posts just like this all from NJ. Sounds like a lotta’ happy campers. Meanwhile, you’d be lucky to find a single post for people going the other way: NC to NJ.

  25. Crossroads Says:

    sounds like maybe Bay Area people should consider moving to N.C.

    i wonder how many bay area people have ever even visited some place outside of the RBA. Unlike NJ, if you drive 6 hours, you’re still basically in California. (or and nv being a suburb of california.)

  26. Renter4 Says:

    I think there’s a couple of different larger trends driving the problems.

    One is the general squeeze on the middle class. No one is getting as much for the money as their parents used to. Salaries haven’t kept pace with increased COL, even if you take inflation into account. Housing is one item that’s more expensive than it used to be. Another is medical expenses/medical insurance. Then there’s the expenses of higher education.

    Then on top of that there’s more people squeezing into “blue” urban areas, mostly for employment. And we are dependent enough on our employers now that we are unlikely to leave an area where jobs are concentrated. So the competition to survive in those areas is ever-increasing.

    The Bay Area is one vortex… NYC/Boston is another.

    For me the standard of living for 250k that you keep mentioning is not worth $150k standard of living in south. Plus the fact that I’ll not risk everything I got for a shack in good school district means that I’ll be renting 1000 sqft apartment all my days in BA. It’s not fun when you realize that you kids don’t have enough space.

    I’m not saying we have a bad life or anything, but yes, this, exactly. We’re into the throes of emergency fund-raising for our “excellent” school district now. Next year the situation will be worse and they’ll want more money.

    I’ve definitely considered moving to NJ. My preference is a suburb of Boston but that comes with its own issues. We’ve also talked about Pennsylvania. My industry has jobs throughout that area. We’re staying, for now, because I want to finish out a couple of years with my company, which is well-respected, and to give my partner’s startup a chance to get somewhere.

    I like the sunshine and all. I’ll miss being close to Yosemite. But there’s some really terrible and fundamental inequities about life in SFBA, and I won’t miss having my nose rubbed in them every time I turn around.

  27. Renter4 Says:

    -course we can’t mention removing prop 13 here. That’s a sure-fire way to not get re-elected.

    I think it may depend on demographics. If the state as a whole is aging then I’m sure you’re right.

  28. Renter4 Says:

    As for moving to NC, the prob is the schools, again. I hear that the ones around RTP are patchy at best.

  29. bob Says:

    Renter4 ,
    I’ve been to PA several times. Pretty nice state in my opinion. Actually, I liked Pittsburgh quite a bit.

    As far as Raleigh is concerned, that’s a case of a number of “surveys” in Money Magazine and others naming it the “best place to live in the USA”. Being that it is actually less than a day’s drive away makes it appetizing for people in Northeastern states. I actually visited it a few months back. The amount of Mcmansions there is almost appalling. Whatever value it held over NJ or MA will soon be eroded at the rate that people are gobbling up the RE. It had slowed quite a bit though since nobody can sell their overpriced houses in NJ to move there anymore.

  30. Renter4 Says:

    I’ve only been to Pittsburgh for a conference. It was pretty nice.

  31. madhaus aka guitar hero Says:

    Apparently the record low was -4.

    Bull$4|+. In January 1977, I remember walking to the convenience store at six thirty in the morning and it was minus 15. I had never been so cold in my entire life. In Central New Jersey. I will never ever ever forget that morning, especially since I was wearing a T-shirt and a winter coat over it and should have had about six more layers in between.

    I lived in New Jersey until my early 20s and then moved out here. Bergen County is actually pretty nice, but if you’re a weather wimp like me, you’d leave too.

    I have plenty of family in Tenafly, NJ and know all the neighborhoods there. That’s some nice schoolin’. You might want to take a look at the property taxes when you check out any offers in NJ, the taxes seem to be random. Some houses are assessed way below what they’re worth, and some are pretty close. You never know when you’ll be re-assessed, either.

    My brother’s place on an acre of land got reassessed this year to about a mil. His taxes are now $14K a year. Meanwhile my cousin in Tenafly, 8 miles away, has a house assessed for $740K and taxes of $17K. Seems to depend on where you live as well.

  32. Pralay Says:

    I think it may depend on demographics. If the state as a whole is aging then I’m sure you’re right.
    ——-

    Aging people – that’s the biggest and reliable voter block. Young people don’t vote.

  33. buckborden Says:

    Bob, thanks for the kind words. We agree on this stuff. I’ll read this for amusement now and bow out of the conversation. My accountant is calling.

  34. Norcalboomer Says:

    Attention BA folks: Please do not come to Raleigh. ALL of NJ has moved to Raleigh. The traffic is getting terrible. The schools are overcrowded. The weather sucks. Please stay in the wonderful Real Bay Area where all is ” milk and honey”. A former Californian.

  35. Renter4 Says:

    Spit it out, norcalboomer. What’s the school system really like?

  36. bob Says:

    Renter4,
    I lived in Boston for 3 years. So I have a fairly good idea of what that is like.

    The good: It is actually a fairly attractive city. Lots of inner parks called “the emerald necklace”. You can actually walk through nothing but parks and get from one end of the city to another

    The “T” is the Boston transit system. Puts the BA’s system to shame. You can live anywhere and be only a few blocks from a train, bus, or subway stop. It is very extensive and can get you all the way up to NH,

    The Museums there are incredible. The MFA is one of the biggest in the country. It has everything from ancient Egyptian artifacts to pop art. I had a pass to the place and never saw all of it after 2 years of going fairly regularly.

    The city itself is very old. Some buildings are from the 1600′s. You simply don’t find history like that out here.

    Pretty good food selection.

    Not too far from Martha’s Vineyard. Nice day outing.

    The BAD.

    The weather. Probably the worst weather I’ve experienced. Winter starts in October and lasts until May or sometimes even June. It is exposed to arctic air coming down from Canada from the sea. The temperature would sometimes get way below Zero. The last year I was there, a two week cold front came in and the wind chill was close to -40. It was so cold that my school and the store I worked in closed. Me and the tenants actually stayed down in the basement of the apartment bldg next to the giant boilers because our apartments were 45 degrees even with the heat on full-blast. Snow would pile up and then freeze solid for months. Then came the summers, which for a place that got so amazingly cold, got insanely hot. I recall flying home from TN one night. It was 11PM and the temp was 97 degrees. It often got over 100 degrees with very high humidity.

    The cost of housing. Most of the nice areas in and around Boston were often as much as it is out here. Victorian homes in Brookline, which is where I lived, cost over 800k each- and this was back in 1999. The outskirts of the city were encircled by hovels with bad crime problems, but even so, homes there were easily 300-350k. I’m not sure how much they are now.

    Lastly- the traffic. If you think it’s bad in the BA… you ain’t seen nothing yet!

    Anyhow, my experience there was that it was a good one, but I don’t care to live anywhere that cold again.It really affects your quality of life, that is unless you don’t mind the cold, which for many that isn’t a problem. We Southerners just happen to be wimps when it comes to that kind of thing.

  37. rick Says:

    - If you’re buying here now, you’re a CEO

    What happen to the cherry picker who bought a $700k house? Come on, people are buying in all walks of life: dry cleaner, hardware store employee, etc.

    All featured on the bubble blogs.

  38. mrbogue Says:

    That cherrypicker bought in Roseville, CA. Thats a far cry from the RBA.

  39. RealEstater Says:

    Bob,

    Boston sounds like BA with bad weather and worse traffic. No thank you.

  40. Norcalboomer Says:

    Renter4:
    AS one poster said, the schools are “patchy”. In Cary lots of bright kids and good schools. Enloe and Broughton in Raleigh are excellent public high schools ( On par with the coveted Cupertino or Palo Alto Schools I would venture). Riverside is a good public high school in Durham ( Many sons and daughters of the few Duke Faculty that choose to send their children to public schools send them to Riverside). My daughter had a friend who graduated from Riverside HS and is now graduating from Princeton. Chapel Hill schools uniformly very good ( high taxes- NOT a Prop 13 kind of place) and many affluent and educated parents ( UNC- Chapel Hill is the UC Berkeley of the South). I’m sure many of the rest of the schools are just like any where else in the U.S. My wife has taught in both California and NC schools. She does not spend nearly as much of her own money on students in NC as she did in California. We still have art/music and PE teachers in NC. Wake County schools ( Raleigh) are overcrowded due to the rapid inflow of Northeasteners into NC. The district can barely keep up building schools. Unlike California it is considered rather shabby to house students in portable classrooms ( I guess on par with ” rednecks” living in trailers).

  41. Renter4 Says:

    Thanks, norcalboomer. Will file your post for reference.

    Boston sounds like BA with bad weather and worse traffic. No thank you.

    Sigh. Oh for my misspent youth in the Real Weather of Boston. Oh for touch football at 9 degrees F in the dark icy fields, blown about by the howling winds! Oh for the steaming August nights when the semi-nude students lay about the dorm lounges in front of their fans, too miserable even for sex!

    Weather that can literally kill you makes you feel ALIVE. That’s why people are so hung up on Beamers out here. They need the fake excitement to keep them going.

  42. burbed Says:

    Boston traffic is bad, but on the other hand there’s T – so there’s a choice.

    On the other hand, good luck getting from Mountain View to Cupertino. Fortunately Google runs its own mass transit system.

  43. Palo Alto: Teachers->Engineers->Doctors->Lawyers->CEOs->? [Burbed.com] Says:

    [...] This quote really stood out the other day, and I thought I’d bubble it up: What personality do you need to succeed in Silicon Valley [Burbed.com] [...]


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