September 9, 2008

Your chance to own a house that Steve Wozniak lived in – huge price cut!

300 Santa Rosa Dr, Los Gatos, CA 95032 MLS# 80812137 – Property Details
$3,900,000


* Status: Active
* Bedroom: 5
* Bathroom: 4
* Year Built: 1986
* Lot Size: 51836
* Square Footage: 7500
* List Date: 5/30/2008
* Garage Spaces: 3
* MLS#: 80812137

THIS IS A UNIQUE HOME UNLIKE ANY OTHER! COMPLETELY CUSTOM BUILT HOME! This home is one of a kind contemporary master piece-sold WAY under valued. Live in the prestigous neighborhood on Santa Rosa Drive with unparallel views of the valley below! Beautiful contemporary estate. HUGE PRICE REDUCTION! MAKE YOUR OFFER!

Well, this is certainly an unusual house, and an unusual way to start the week. Let’s see what the anonymous Burbed reader who sent this in had to say:

I hate to pick on a house once owned by RBA-king Steve Wozniak, but I’ve been watching this one with interest for at least a year.It started at a $10 million list price and after at least four cuts, the realtor screams “HUGE PRICE REDUCTION! MAKE YOUR OFFER!”No kidding, what a bargain at $3.9M, huh?I actually feel bad for the flipper (or at least the financiers behind it), and even before the crash late last summer I thought he overpaid by a couple million.He paid $6.9 million after all.The bubble owner/sellers must be very happy now!

Oh, and the original website set up to market this house even had quotes of praise from Thomas Kinkade.(Yes, the franchised purveyor of so-called “fine art.”)

Wow! Wow! Wow!

This is your last chance to own a piece of Silicon Valley history. Imagine living here? It’s amazing. It’s stunning. It’s too awesome to believe!

And now, just $3.9 million. Could it be worth it?

Thanks anonymous Burbed reader for this amazing find and backstory!

Comments (165) -- Posted by: burbed @ 5:09 am

165 Responses to “Your chance to own a house that Steve Wozniak lived in – huge price cut!”

  1. tandjam Says:

    I’m not a real estate person, I just read this blog for fun while I wait for the day when I’m not priced out of the BA anymore. I was surprised to see this house featured here. In the past, I’ve been in this house many times because someone I know lived there for a while.

    This home has a lot of special custom extras that are pretty cool, especially if you have kids, because Woz built this home with his kids in mind. One example: hidden in the back yard, under the koi ponds, where nobody but the gardener or a little kid would find it, is a cave to explore with crystals sticking out of the walls, ‘dinosaur foot prints’ and windows to look under the water. The house is full of fun hidden stuff like that. It really is ‘unique’ and ‘unlike any other.’

    I loved the floor plan of the home, the amazing views from almost all of the bedrooms, and all the windows that let in the light and views… It’s a beautiful and very comfortable home.

  2. bob Says:

    Never thought I’d say this… But compared to all the little bitty houses in Palo Alto with 1 million dollar asking prices, this massive home which is an actual mansion ( not to be mistaken for a Mcmansion) seems to be a better “value”. Heck- why not buy it, split it up into a quadra-plex, have each family pay the easily obtainable sum of $3,000 a month. You and your family could convert the garage into a house ( because I’m sure the garage is larger than most PA houses) and then only owe approximately $12,000 per month! Think about it… since so many couples in the BA are now making dual 200k salaries, this could easily be within your reach!

  3. WillowGlenner Says:

    Hey Madhaus, Cupertino Square filed for bankruptcy it looks like.
    http://blog.redfin.com/sfbay/2008/09/cupertino_square_owners_file_for_bankrupcy.html

  4. Herve Says:

    > this massive home […] seems to be a better “value”.

    I agree with bob. As far as such big houses are concerned, it looks like you get more for your money in Los Gatos or Portola Valley. Although slanted soccer fields are a real issue in Portola Valley, residents can always go to Palo Alto.

    And this one, at $520 per sq ft, is even better value than yesterday’s house in San Bruno!

  5. Herve Says:

    > slanted soccer fields are a real issue in Portola Valley

    Really, I am not kidding.

  6. rick Says:

    This is insane! Insane I tell ya. I mean if you divide this house and lot by 10, and it is only the same price as the San Bruno dump with more footage and 50% bigger lot, and this is RBA! What happened to the RBA? I feel sorry for the RBA folks.

  7. nomadic Says:

    Rick, are you saying the house is a bargain at twice the price? 😉 Better snap it up quick! $6 million of instant equity is there for the taking!

  8. rick Says:

    nomadic, I am saying this house worth at least 20m. I wonder where are Google CEOs, are they too cheap to cough up 20m for this beauty? Sure beats a Gulfstream jet, this is equity while that jet costs them 20m a year, why you need to have meeting elsewhere when you can have a 5k sq ft conference facility? Does a Manhattan condo has covered 50k sqf lot? Heck you can even park that jet on the lot, or a helicopter for each attending CEO, to be practical.

  9. Roxboy Says:

    Hi I am Steve Wozniack – owner of Apple. I don’t own this house. My house is actually down the block.

    I wanted to buy this house back in the DotCom days, but I was outbidded. Some high school dude outbidded me. You see, this teenager dude just graduated from high school and he got a 6-figure income job from some startup company back in 1999. He got stock options and a brand new BMW 5-series as a signing bonus. The stock skyrocketed then he sold the stocks and bought this house. Back in 1999, my company Apple was still trying to survive. Had it not been for IPODs, my company would be out of business and I would be on welfare by now.

    Everyday I drive by this house, I want to scratch that teenager dude’s car that outbidded me this house.

  10. madhaus Says:

    Oh, I see the problem. This house is in the wrong Los Gatos Zip Code. 95030 is the good one.

    WG, thanks for the news on Vallco (I still can’t call it Cupertino Square). We’ve been going to the movies there since the theater opened, because it’s usually pretty uncrowded and it’s probably the nicest of the AMC theaters I’ve seen. (The one in El Paseo is awful, and the one in Santa Clara/101 has the worst parking situation I’ve seen anywhere.)

    I really don’t get why they can’t turn that mall around. It is right between Valley Fair and Snodfart, and I’d rather shop close to home if they’d put some decent stores in. Every time I go there it is deserted except for the theater and the dim sum place (Dynasty) which is always busy.

  11. Hellboy Says:

    Falley Fair is trying to do what Sunnyvale is trying to do, if they can get more money. It’s the same thing Santana Row did. Put in a bunch of fancy condos and voila you have all the demand you need from all those “captive” homeowners/borrowers. Seems like the trendy thing to do but we’ll see if Sunnyvale is successful first?

  12. Rocket Says:

    When we were looking for a place to rent I told my wife we could always live at the mall (Santana Row). Their 4 bedroom 3 bath units are at $5500 or so per month asking price. 🙂

    That idea went down like a lead balloon.

  13. Ross Says:

    Valco is floundering because it is stuck with Sears and JCPenny (both own their own land). While just down Stevens Creek, Target and Whole Foods are jam packed. Even Eastrige is doing better than Valco, and look where it is.

  14. WillowGlenner Says:

    4 BR places at Santana Row are a lot more than $5500/mo.

    900 sq ft places are $2400 and they go up from there.
    http://sfbay.craigslist.org/sby/apa/833987408.html

  15. Pralay Says:

    I don’t think Sears and JC Penny are the primary reasons. The project could have been done accommodating both of these stores. There are enough space in both sides of the street.

  16. cupertinoster Says:

    Valco/Cupertino Square cannot succeed because JC Penny and Sears detract from it. Think about it – would you go to Bellgaio or Wynn to go shopping if there was a JC Penny or a Sears there? Hell No. What they they need to do is build a collection of stores that adequately meet the needs of the community. They should have a Maseratti dealership for the plethora of millionaires, a Giorgio Armani to cloth those millionaires, a Cracker Barrel for the Whiskey Tango who still live there because of Prop 13, a boba/kareoke bar for the Chinese. Maybe sock and sandal store to capture all of the Chindian crowd – oh and a Kumon/Sylvian. Then Valco would be successful.

  17. cardinal2007 Says:

    WillowGlenner, where do you get that information:

    Santana Row:
    * Sq.Ft: 2271
    * BR: 4
    * BA: 3 Bath
    * Rent: $5525 – 5600
    * Dep: $1000

    That is straight from their site:
    http://www.santanarowapts.com/property_home_page/home?page_name=our_property

    Regardless of what you may want it to rent for they advertise them for $5500/month.

    I am just picking on what you said because you said it with such authority.

  18. rick Says:

    WG, I thought you would’ve checked on redfin at least. How much are these condos asking for? Average $700 per sqf, for 2200 sqf this one would be yours for 1.5m.

    I wonder is there multiple phases, I received flyer early last year that 2 bedrooms in Santana Row was rent-to-own for $1700 a month, no down payment and 40 year mortgage on 4% interest.

    Then again, I don’t know that market at all.

  19. RealEstater Says:

    >>Valco is floundering because it is stuck with Sears and JCPenny (both own their own land). While just down Stevens Creek, Target and Whole Foods are jam packed. Even Eastrige is doing better than Valco, and look where it is.

    In the RBA, the action is always in high-end. Stanford Mall and Valley Fair are always jam packed, while the old Sunnyvale Town Center and Vallco malls were dying. It’s just no fun for people here to shop in places like Sears and JCP. It’s better for these stores to move to the East Bay where they’ll find more customers.

    The same is true in the restaurant business. Typically you need to wait in line to get into a high end restaurant.

  20. Pralay Says:

    It’s just no fun for people here to shop in places like Sears and JCP.
    ——–

    Didn’t someone said that the Target store across Stevens Creek is jampacked?

    ———
    The same is true in the restaurant business. Typically you need to wait in line to get into a high end restaurant.
    ———

    In University Ave the only place you need to wait in line in weekend is Cheesecake Factory. I don’t think it is considered high end restaurant. High end restaurants there are pretty empty and you can always find tables. 🙂

  21. DreamT Says:

    I think highly of Target especially the one in Cupertino, but… high-end? Last I checked, Target is a discount store. Also nearby’s Marina Foods is packed and further down on Wolfe, parking across Ranch 99 is always a challenge… yet these aren’t exactly high-end either.
    In my opinion, Vallco just looks (and smells) old. Many folks go to the mall to kill time, “go out”. Who’d want to spend the afternoon in a glitterless, musty place? Plus every time I go there, another store is closing, giving me one less reason to stop by. The whole place needs to scale down in size and get prettyfied.

  22. sonarrat Says:

    Valco/Cupertino Square cannot succeed because JC Penny and Sears detract from it.

    Tanforan in San Bruno has both of those stores, and it’s hopping. I think location has a lot to do with it.. Cupertino is a sleepy suburb and never has been a destination for the teen crowd, and it’s too close to several other areas that ARE destinations. Same reason why Fashion Island in Foster City failed.

  23. RealEstater Says:

    >>Also nearby’s Marina Foods is packed and further down on Wolfe, parking across Ranch 99 is always a challenge… yet these aren’t exactly high-end either.

    Those are niche markets. You cannot find the same products at Whole Food.

  24. DreamT Says:

    RealEstater – You can find them in nearby’s Kyo-Po which is more upscale. So your argument about upscale and niches doesn’t hold.

  25. RealEstater Says:

    Sorry, never heard of Kyo-Po.

  26. DreamT Says:

    http://eat.tanspace.com/2008/06/21/super-kyo-po-market-korean-plaza-%E5%83%91%E8%83%9E%E5%B8%82%E5%A0%B4-in-santa-clara/ for the most recent location. Worth a stop.

  27. cardinal2007 Says:

    I remember the Walmart in MV (in 2004) was always busy, after a year or so I got tired of it, and started shopping at the Target across the street, a much nicer experience.

    So it is not neccesarily upscale places that are crowded, the In-n-Out is also often crowded.

  28. DreamT Says:

    I’m waiting to hear that In’n’Out is either a niche market or an upscale fast food. 🙂

  29. Pralay Says:

    It looks like Orange County mentality all over here.

    Our mall is better than yours.”
    “Our stores are high end than yours.”
    “We RBA people eat at only high end restaurants.”

    Oh, yes, Ranch 99 is niche market. Most of the people I find are doing regular grocery there, using discount coupons that comes in USPS mailbox. Sometimes I go there to get fish. Now I have no doubt that I am getting high end fish. 🙂

  30. Pralay Says:

    I’m waiting to hear that In’n’Out is either a niche market or an upscale fast food.
    ——–

    Where else can you get high end transfat 4×4? That’s so special – just like RBA.

  31. RealEstater Says:

    Guys,

    You need to differentiate between real shopping and just shopping for everyday stuff. When people go to a mall, they are looking for an experience. When people go out to buy bread, butter and tooth paste, then some are looking for niche products, some looking for low price, while others want a pleasant experience as well (e.g. Whole Food).

  32. DreamT Says:

    “The problem is that people feel entitled.”
    High-school dropouts can build and run world-class companies. Pesky third-world foreigners can buy in good neighborhoods. The government continues to stand by and encourage every American citizen’s right-by-birth to own a piece of land. The baby-boomer generation secured low property taxes and social retirement benefits for life. Instant riches from IPOs and house flipping. Who wouldn’t feel entitled??
    Oh, I know. First-generation immigrants. 😉

  33. RealEstater Says:

    Pralay,

    You need to differentiate between dining and eating.

  34. DreamT Says:

    RealEstater – “real shopping”? That’s your weakest weaseling out yet. If “real” means “expensive” as opposed to daily items, you just throw a circular argument at us. “Real” shopping requiring upscale retailing centers? Duh!

  35. Pralay Says:

    Cupertino is a sleepy suburb and never has been a destination for the teen crowd, and it’s too close to several other areas that ARE destinations.
    ———

    So all Cupertino Square needed are
    – some daycare centers
    – something for after-school programs
    – chinese restaurant
    – indian restaurant
    – Target/Walmart

    I think that’s why all the strip-malls are doing pretty well.

  36. Pralay Says:

    Oh, yes, people in Real Bay Area do need Real Shopping. And that means they need to shop at Whole Food. And last time I checked people at Berkeley get same thing in cheaper price – from Berkeley Bowl. So I guess Berkeley people are not doing Real shopping – just because they are buying same thing in cheaper price.

  37. madhaus Says:

    Except Vallco has always had a daycare center, it’s near the entrance at the JC Penney side on the 2nd floor. (Along the walkway past the stairs down to the ice rink.)

    Don’t know about afterschool programs, but no Kumon. Plenty of space to put one in, though.

    There is a big Chinese restaurant already there, Dynasty. Also big Japanese-style buffet, Todai. (I say Japanese-style because some of the food doesn’t seem as authentic as it could be.) No Indian restaurant.

    Sunnyvale Town Center has a Target and that didn’t help it either.

    Both these dying malls also have Macy’s. Do you see the pattern? Also Target bought the Montgomery Wards stores from both Sunnyvale TC and Westgate, speaking of dying stores.

  38. Pralay Says:

    I think Dynasty is the only thing doing well there.

  39. nomadic Says:

    Sunnyvale Town Center and Vallco both had the same feel:

    1) Lots of vacancies

    2) Many “one off” stores that look like someone imports cheap products themselves and don’t have a clue about marketing. The signs would even look homemade or like Kinko’s made them. Sparse/plain fixtures too.

    3) Old and dated

  40. RealEstater Says:

    >>There is a big Chinese restaurant already there, Dynasty

    Again, that is a high end place, and therefore successful.

  41. madhaus Says:

    There’s a new real high-end successful place on Homestead and Stelling. It’s a payday loan center.

  42. Pralay Says:

    Again, that is a high end place, and therefore successful.
    ——

    What is the definition of high end?
    High price? Good food? Ambiance? Service?

    Except good food I don’t other items mentioned above exist there.

  43. anon Says:

    payday loans? But those only exist in the ‘east’ bay.

    Looks like someone needs to know how to argue a real distinction.

  44. WillowGlenner Says:

    Vallco, Sunnyvale Town Center, Eastridge, San Mateo fashion island (town down now) and Oakridge Mall in San Jose were all built around the same time- mid ’70s and they were built to REPLACE the old antiquated outdoor malls from the 60s which were Valley Fair, Stanford and Hillsdale Mall. Instead the owners of the older malls decided to upgrade them, because Stanford, VF and Hillsdale all have superior locations to the newer places, Stanford tried a modified outdoor style that turned out to be very successful and made the indoor (once new) malls seem dated, and Valley Fair decided to go all out and combine the 2 anchors Macys and Emporium (then) in an indoor facility that people thought was too big to ever fill up- there used to be a huge parking lot between Macy’s and Emporium and for that reason VF appeared to be a white elephant. In the end the refurbed original malls took out the newer malls built in the 70s. I don’t think it ever occurred to those building Vallco or Sunnyvale Town that they would ever be in competition with a resurgent Stanford or Valley Fair.

  45. WillowGlenner Says:

    I was told payday loans are very popular with construction workers for 2 reasons, one is they need the money but the other is that business is notorious for bounced checks. In fact many construction projects I do, the contractors want to be paid in cash (unless they know me), which I find problematic depending on the dollar amount involved.

  46. anon Says:

    “THIS IS A UNIQUE HOME UNLIKE ANY OTHER! COMPLETELY CUSTOM BUILT HOME! This home is one of a kind contemporary master piece-sold WAY under valued.”

    I love it. How many ways can you say its unique?
    1) unique
    2) unlike any other
    3) completely custom (I suppose its implied here)
    4) one of a kind

    This comment is cute: “Live in the prestigous neighborhood on Santa Rosa Drive…”

    Presti-gous? Sounds messy.

    May I introduce the concept of ‘instant prestige’? The idea that prestige can be acquired by purchase of home located in a certain area (zip code)?

  47. nomadic Says:

    anon- not only a certain area, but a particular street. Granted, it does follow the ridge above eastern Los Gatos… This house is on the Shannon valley side of the ridge, so no view of downtown San Jose.

  48. Herve Says:

    > When people go out to buy bread, butter and tooth paste […]

    Worst. Sandwich. Ever.

  49. Missing the 80's Says:

    I remember when Vallco was busy and happening back in the late 1980’s. The mall seemed full (no vacant stores) and TGIFriday’s was a big draw. Then all of a sudden in the 90’s the place turned into a ghost town. I guess the popularity of Stanford and Valley Fair/Santana Row was partially to blame, but it seems like more than that contributed to its demise. And speaking of dying malls….what’s happening with Sunnyvale Town Center? Did it go bankrupt, too? They’ve been working on it for years with no end in sight.

  50. Lionel Says:

    “>>There is a big Chinese restaurant already there, Dynasty

    Again, that is a high end place, and therefore successful.”

    I predict over the next two years, the converse will be true. As the recession squeezes the life out of the economy, expense accounts will be cut, and the higher end restaurants will get decimated.

  51. madhaus Says:

    Lionel, if that’s the case, first restaurant to close will be Alexander’s Steakhouse. That place has $100 Kobe steaks and $30 appetizers.

  52. becky Says:

    I remember reading about Woz’s amazing place in the Mercury News when it was built. I think I was most impressed by the pool with a big slide.

    I remember when Vallco was the happening place. I lived less than a mile from Valley Fair, but we’d take the bus (25) all the way to Vallco. And occasionally we’d take the bus all the way to Stanford Shopping Center (because it had the totally exotic Banana Republic – back when they sold faux safari gear.

  53. burbed Says:

    Remember back when Banana Republic used to have jeeps in their stores?

    How wild was that!

  54. Pralay Says:

    I predict over the next two years, the converse will be true. As the recession squeezes the life out of the economy, expense accounts will be cut, and the higher end restaurants will get decimated.
    ——–

    Lionel,
    Some who declares Dynasty as high-end never been to this restaurant. It’s as simple as that.

  55. anon Says:

    “Remember back when Banana Republic used to have jeeps in their stores? ”

    Lol yeah, and old navy used to have those junkers!

  56. Pralay Says:

    I think Old Navy still keeps those junkers in stores.

  57. RealEstater Says:

    >>Some who declares Dynasty as high-end never been to this restaurant.

    Someone who thinks Dynasty is not high end is an idiot.

  58. anon Says:

    This:

    http://www.yelp.com/biz/dynasty-chinese-seafood-restaurant-cupertino#hrid:DK3D_TeF2Eypt-dLccqIRQ/query:dynasty

    ?

  59. Pralay Says:

    RealEstater,
    Ever been to Dynansty? What kind of ambiance there? Chaotic or better? What kind of service?
    I am getting some idea about the standard of your “high end” (and I can’t believe that this guy lives in Palo Alto, couple of blocks from University Ave).

    As DreamT said, next time you will call In-N-Out burder is high end too – just because selling well.

  60. anon Says:

    Wow, this just gets better and better. A google images search makes this place look like your typical strip mall type Asian place.

    I must experience this ‘fine dining.’

  61. DreamT Says:

    RealEstater does not choose high-end restaurants to dine out. Restaurants become high-end once RealEstater has dined there.

  62. Pralay Says:

    This:

    http://www.yelp.com/biz/dynasty-chinese-seafood-restaurant-cupertino#hrid:DK3D_TeF2Eypt-dLccqIRQ/query:dynasty

    ?
    ——–

    As someone put it correctly in Yelp:

    Atmosphere: Totally Nuts!!

    A moderate price restaurant with 3 star rating (only) and cheap decor is “high end”!
    But food there is pretty good, no doubt about it.

  63. anon Says:

    There is no Real in RE. Only facade.

    Is this applicable?

    http://failblog.files.wordpress.com/2008/06/fb181.jpg?w=500&h=340

  64. Pralay Says:

    RealEstater does not choose high-end restaurants to dine out. Restaurants become high-end once RealEstater has dined there.
    ——-

    No Chuck Norris please.

  65. anon Says:

    Most of the complaints seem to stem from either service complaints or price complaints. Remember, Real Bay Area food is a privilege not a right.

    You get what you pay for. If the food is expensive, it is good.

  66. Pralay Says:

    You know what, dollar stores are high end, and that’s why they are successful. In addition, it niche market. Lots of thing you don’t get anywhere else. For example,

    Walmart is high end too. And that’s why they are successful.

    And did I talk about another high-end restaurant? It’s Burger King. They are high end and successful.

  67. RealEstater Says:

    You guys are totally clueless. Dynasty holds wedding banquets every weekend. Chinese won’t pick anything but high end for such events. The restaurant has private rooms, which is another sign of high end Chinese restaurants. The restaurant serves many delicate seafood, with prices to match. Pralay of course cannot tell the difference, as many Indians don’t eat seafood (most actually prefer Panda Express type of food). The ambiance at the restaurant is similar to other top Chinese restaurants in the BA, such as Joy Luck and Mayflower. Unlike western restaurants, what is valued by Chinese clientel is fine food in a busy environment. Service is never a big part of the equation.

  68. DreamT Says:

    Pralay – Chuck Norris also goes to Dynasty? I’ll have to check out the place (once I have a job)
    anon – “If the food is expensive, it is good” Nope. Food price is a combination of talent, ingredients, location, decoration, service and market position. I know of too many “expensive” places with average food to agree with you.
    Unless you were sarcastic on that one…

  69. anon Says:

    Right. Because the Chinese are known for their gourmet food. Just like the french.

    I don’t even know where to begin by dissecting your logical reasoning, but that paragraph is rife with fallacies.

  70. DreamT Says:

    RealEstater – “Service is never a big part of the equation.”
    Try and leave a fancy chinese place without giving a tip to the horrendous waiter. You’ll soon enough see that service tipping is actually taken for granted by the staff regardless of the service. He’ll actually physically prevent you from leaving the place until he gets what he wrongly feels entitled to get. So service is not a big part of the equation until you reward it as deserved, then it becomes a big deal!

  71. anon Says:

    DT: Completely sarcastic. To say expensive therefore good is a non sequitor, if I remember correctly.

  72. DreamT Says:

    I believe the ‘fancy’ restaurant in question was the Mayflower, back in 1997. I know, anecdotal story.

  73. DreamT Says:

    anon – Then your sarcasm is more obscure than most and that explains a bit.

  74. Pralay Says:

    RealEstater,
    I like the food in Dynasty. I don’t dispute about the quality of food.
    But you are yet to define the definition of high end. And wedding banquet? Don’t tell me Chinese people pick only high end for such events. That’s your stereo-type – just like your stereo type that Indians don’t eat sea-food (some part of India, seafood/fresh water fish is primary non-veg item). Just read the Yelp reviews. Many chose this place for only one reason – their banquet hall is BIG. And those reviews are written by Chinese.

  75. RealEstater Says:

    Chinese food is magnitudes more sophisticated than French food. I’ve been to France and I’ve been to China. There’s no way French food can even come close to Chinese food. Lunch in China is frequently a 5 course meal with soup prepared in intricate ways, while the French will have a baguette that tastes like a piece of rock.

  76. anon Says:

    Lol… sometimes I can’t even tell myself.

    Just to add fuel to the fire I’ll throw out some of my experience. The majority of places in Santana Row fall under the expensive and average category.

  77. DreamT Says:

    RealEstater – Maybe next time you are in France you try high-end restaurants (you know, the kind politicians dine at). But I’m not too surprised you couldn’t find a local French person to guide you to the right place. French folks have rather high standards about giving friendly advice and you wouldn’t meet them (and would call them ‘snob’ as a result)

  78. DreamT Says:

    anon – I must say though the CPK and the Pasta Pomodoro at Santana Row are among the best in the chain, comparing favorably even to San Francisco’s locations where palates are reportedly more refined. The independent restaurants, that’s another story. And I caught two cheating on the tip – only in Santana Row!!

  79. anon Says:

    a baguette that tastes like a rock! This is all you could find in France?

    Oh lord. You are an exceptional human being.

  80. anon Says:

    Cheating on the tip?

  81. RealEstater Says:

    >>That’s your stereo-type – just like your stereo type that Indians don’t eat sea-food (some part of India, seafood/fresh water fish is primary non-veg item).

    It’s a stereotype that has a lot of truth in it. Several times we had a company lunch at a Sushi Buffet place, and the Indian guys would only eat the salad.

    >>And those reviews are written by Chinese.

    Actually if I go to a Chinese restaurant, I’d like to see a lot of Chinese customers there (same goes for other cuisines).

  82. RealEstater Says:

    I’ve been to a few so-called high end restaurants in France. What always ends up happening is I wait for 2 hours before they are able to serve the food, and the dishes look like something I can probably learn to cook in 5 minutes. French food sucks in general, and French women aren’t that great looking, all contrary to popular myth.

  83. DreamT Says:

    anon – The Mexican place next to Ben&Jerry taking a few more $$ than I wrote, then working with citysearch to block my negative review. The French place overbilled me $10 on the tip but a call to the manager was sufficient to reverse it. One could blame my foreign way of writing numbers but I’ve had ZERO other instances of this happening over 10+ years.

  84. DreamT Says:

    RealEstater – French women aren’t meant to be part of the food. As for the two hours wait, as I previously explained you either weren’t in good company or you weren’t good company.
    In any case, enjoy China, be my guest 🙂

  85. Pralay Says:

    Unlike western restaurants, what is valued by Chinese clientel is fine food in a busy environment. Service is never a big part of the equation.
    ——–

    Now that’s a gem. Someone is educating about other culture without having any clue about it. In oriental culture hospitality (and that includes service) is big part of it. Just because you are used to with bad service from moderate restaurants, that’s does not mean that’s the norm. With RealEstater’s definition of “high end”, the street food would be the “high end food (or resataurant)” in non-western culture, because that’s where you get the best food (or “fine food in a busy environment”) in China/India.

  86. RealEstater Says:

    Look around your home. Does anyone own any French product that’s any good?

  87. DreamT Says:

    “Actually if I go to a Chinese restaurant, I’d like to see a lot of Chinese customers there”

    RealEstater, this is indicative of authentic cuisine, not of great food. Fusion would typically not meet this criteria. Next argument please.

  88. DreamT Says:

    RealEstater – French women? French products? You’re all over the map. Unfortunately the topic of the day is high-end restaurants. You’re stretching yourself too wide to manage to make whatever point you’re after.

  89. anon Says:

    Here’s another one:

    “Service is never a big part of the equation.”

    a couple posts later a complaint about the service: “What always ends up happening is I wait for 2 hours before they are able to serve the food, and the dishes look like something I can probably learn to cook in 5 minutes.

    Now, I’m not an expert in this, but my understanding is that in France, poor service is somewhat to be expected. In a generic looking chinese place in a strip mall here in the US, however, it’s kind of odd to say that the service is irrelevant.

  90. Pralay Says:

    It’s a stereotype that has a lot of truth in it. Several times we had a company lunch at a Sushi Buffet place, and the Indian guys would only eat the salad.
    ——–

    I have no doubt you don’t hang out with too many Indians. Your stereotype is streotype – absolutely no truth.
    Before coming to USA, the only Americans I saw are those who travel to India for vacation, go to beach and smoke ganja (Indian version of marijuana) and heroine (and some even die in overdose – right on beach). With this stereotype, I can assume that RealEstater is a druggie.

  91. RealEstater Says:

    >>Fusion would typically not meet this criteria. Next argument please.

    I don’t care for Fusion. Little bits of food on a big plate for big money isn’t my idea of a good meal.

  92. DreamT Says:

    anon – I think compared to the US, any other country in the world has poorer service. I spilled a vanilla shake on the floor at a Milpitas McDonald in ’97, and was preparing to clean the mess myself. Not only they apologized to me while they cleaned the floor, but they instantly gave me another one for free.
    Right there is one of the biggest cultural gaps between the US and Europe.

  93. RealEstater Says:

    >>In a generic looking chinese place in a strip mall here in the US, however, it’s kind of odd to say that the service is irrelevant.

    Service is irrelevant. Do an informal survey. You’ll be convinced.

  94. DreamT Says:

    RealEstater – Ah, you haven’t been to good Fusion restaurants in San Francisco? Why would you anyway, you now live in your destination city and have everything you need at walking distance!
    You’re showing tonight that one can live in Palo Alto for many years and still have absolutely no clue whatsoever about dining, bay area restaurants and ethnic cuisines.

  95. RealEstater Says:

    >>I think compared to the US, any other country in the world has poorer service.

    Are you kidding me? Have you ever taken Japan Airlines? US is not a service oriented country by any means.

  96. Pralay Says:

    The majority of places in Santana Row fall under the expensive and average category.
    ————

    In Santana Row the only place we go often is Yankee Pier and that is also for only one dish – fresh oysters. Other items are average.

  97. DreamT Says:

    Japan Airlines isn’t a country. Aggregates, RealEstater, aggregates.

  98. anon Says:

    Yeah, my experience has been the same. It still blows me away that they will give away a replacement when the customer is at fault. I feel it makes for good service and I’m more likely to patronize a place like that.

    Fusion = small? I thought it was used to characterize a restaurant that serves a confluence of foods from different origins. Have you ever been to http://www.aquicalmex.com/menu/wg_menu.php ?

  99. RealEstater Says:

    DreamT,

    You have no idea what makes for good food. Fusion is just a gimmick.

  100. Pralay Says:

    Are you kidding me? Have you ever taken Japan Airlines? US is not a service oriented country by any means.
    —–

    I agree. Never traveled to JAL, but most of the asian airlines have very good service. Singapore Airlines is the best. In India, the kind of hospitality you get in economy class is not available even in business class in America.

  101. RealEstater Says:

    anon,

    A place like this means they cannot cook any kind of food well. I remember one time when I passed by a small town in the Central Valley, there was a restaurant that serves Chinese & Italian food. Boy, that just sounds so appetizing!

  102. anon Says:

    LOl in some cases yeah, it certainly does.

    There’s a pizza place that serves a thai pizza which is thai peanut sauce, carmelized onions, carmelized red peppers, PEANUTS and chicken sa-tay on a pizza. It’s horrible.

  103. RealEstater Says:

    >>agree. Never traveled to JAL, but most of the asian airlines have very good service. Singapore Airlines is the best. In India, the kind of hospitality you get in economy class is not available even in business class in America.

    For once, I strongly agree with Pralay. DreamT must never have been outside this country. Singapore Air is #1, JAL and China Airlines are terrific as well. Hotel services are the same way.

  104. DreamT Says:

    anon – I have not. Thanks, I’ll check it out.
    RealEstater – You still think you have some credibility left writing lofty statements such as this? Good food is what whomever can afford any restaurants will end up patronizing by choice. That does include Fusion restaurants along with representatives from pretty much any cuisine in the world.
    Don’t you have work tomorrow?

  105. RealEstater Says:

    Don’t forget, I’m a widely traveled person. I work for airline miles, and I’ve seen it all.

  106. anon Says:

    Aside from the usual entertainment, this has been a productive conversation. I’m going to go check out yankee pier and dynasty thanks to you guys.

  107. Pralay Says:

    Actually if I go to a Chinese restaurant, I’d like to see a lot of Chinese customers there
    ———–

    Not true. On the contrary, if you cannot attract customer from other tastes (and culture) it’s very likely not a good restaurant.
    Chinese people will go to chinese restaurant, Afghani people will go to Afghani restaurant – that’s the default. What is so big deal about it? I know enough crappy Indian restaurants where only people go there are Indians.

  108. RealEstater Says:

    >>Don’t you have work tomorrow?

    Of course, why? It’s already tomorrow, but it’s not time to go to work yet.

  109. anon Says:

    On that note, what is your preferred south bay indian restaurant?

    BTW, the enchiladas at Aquis are good.

  110. DreamT Says:

    RealEstater – Took business class on Malaysian then Singapore airlines a few years ago and it was indeed the best travel experience I’ve ever had. Hotel service was comparable to the very best hotel service in the US (more attentive staff, I’ll grant). But that’s irrelevant, because I was discussing aggregate service level within a country.
    You really think I’ve not traveled much? What kind of manager are you to constantly jump to wrong conclusions?

  111. anon Says:

    Burbed needs a chat room so when things get heated a written record isn’t created.

  112. Pralay Says:

    China Airlines are terrific as well.
    ———-

    But don’t forget that they had 6 crashes in last 15 years. Not very good record.
    Just to contrast the record, many international airlines never had any crash so far.

  113. DreamT Says:

    RealEstater – Well maybe a bit more sleep will add some coherence, perspective and most of all focus to your posts.

  114. RealEstater Says:

    >>On that note, what is your preferred south bay indian restaurant?

    Try this place:

    http://www.madhubanindiancuisine.net/contactus.htm

  115. anon Says:

    Thanks.

  116. Pralay Says:

    On that note, what is your preferred south bay indian restaurant?
    ——-

    It depends on what kind of Indian food. For south indian Saravanaa Bhavan and Udupi Palace are good. For north Indian, I don’t like any of them in south bay. Kebab and Curry (@ Santa Clara) is Ok. SF, Berkeley have good ones for north indians. For Pakistani food (simlar to north Indian) Shalimar is good one (but service and ambiance are worst). There is a very good north Indian buffet place in Fremont called Bombay Garden, but I heard their quality has fallen substantially in last few years.

  117. Pralay Says:

    Try this place:

    http://www.madhubanindiancuisine.net/contactus.htm
    ———

    Not far from my workplace. Typical place where Indian hitech people who work at nearby areas (AMD, Applied Materials etc) eat in lunch. Nothing special.

  118. anon Says:

    It’s interesting – I haven’t found the south bay to be that great for food. Berkeley and SF are superior, IMO.

  119. Lionel Says:

    I lived in Paris in my wayward youth. Anyone who can’t find good food there is a complete imbecile. Seriously.

  120. crossroads Says:

    please explain the cheating on tip thing?

  121. anon Says:

    Buy a meal on credit card. Write in X for tip, sign receipt. Restaurant staff changes tip to include X+Y. New amount shows up on credit card.

    Ie: A 5 could become a 6 by rounding out the lower part. a 7 becomes a 17 by adding a 1, etc etc.

  122. madhaus Says:

    That’s why you should use a check digit in your tip so you know immediately that it’s been changed.

    Example: Say I always add random change amount to make my tip add up to lucky number eight:

    I eat at High-End Restaurant and get bill for $58.43. Typically I tip 20% unless service is subpar, then I scale down below 15%. So tip is going to be a little under $12.

    $58.43 + 12 = 70.43.
    add it up: 7+0+4+3= 14, need to adjust the tip to make LUCKY EIGHT.

    $58.43 + 11.50 = 69.93 —> 6+9+9+3 = 27, 2+6=9.
    Lower tip by one penny.
    $58.43 + 11.49 = 69.92 —> 6+9+9+2 = 26, 2+6=8 YAY!

    Now, if High End Restaurant is also High End Cheat Palace, they change my bill from $69.92 to 89.92.

    8+9+9+2=28, DOES NOT EQUAL EIGHT so I know they changed it.

    And since you pick your own rule or check digit, if they change it they have no idea you have a check on them.

    I figure everyone except a high tech guy should be able to follow this.

  123. anon Says:

    “I figure everyone except a high tech guy should be able to follow this.”

    LOL. Implementing a checksum in your tiping algorithm – never thought of that. I just round to even numbers.

    So I read this article in money about 8 months ago saying that 20% is the new 15%. This was before the “recession.” Does that mean that we’re back to 15% being the new 15%, or can we start to say that 10% is the new 15%?

    Am I crazy to think that the waiter should be doing back flips to deserve 20%?

  124. rick Says:

    Ah interesting discussion about tipping.

    Madhaus, I think if they were to cheat, they would’ve done it before you tip, because people can’t add, they simply inflate their dish prices or something else so that by the time you get the bill it is already inflated 20%. Some of them already included 15% tip and they don’t tell you, so you add 15% on top of that.

    I really hate this kind of cheaters. They don’t deserve a penny for tipping. Tip needs to be earned, I have no business paying for a waiter’s living if he ignores me all the time or is even snobbish. Especially those high end restaurants, 15% is entitle thing for them, there was a NYC restaurant called police when a customer refused to pay them a good tip complaining bad service.

  125. rick Says:

    There was a Thai restaurant in Monterey that charged $10 service fee for party of more than 5, on top of tipping, and they did not write that anywhere or noticed patrons before the bill, I wonder if that is legal. I think it is the same scheme you guys are describing, they simply give lame excuses when caught.

  126. madhaus Says:

    Well, I leave it as an exercise to the burbed readers to figure out whether someone who uses a checksum in her tipping algorithm would also check every line item on the menu.

    Which is even more fun when you go to a High End Place like Dynasty and your itemized check is a column of numbers with mandarin characters next to them. I figure my bill at Dynasty translates as follows:

    Cheap-ass dim sum x 4 = $6.00
    Almost acceptable dim sum x 3 = $7.50
    Dim sum unworthy of my ancestors x 4 = $14.00
    Our highest quality golden phoenix dragon prosperity number eight dim sum x 2 = $10
    Soda x 2 = $5.00
    Eating While White = $8.50
    Service charge to round eyes only = $16.50
    Jasmine Tea = $4.00
    Serving Fine Quality Jasmine Tea to Ignorant Foreigners Who Down It Like Coffee = $8.00

  127. anon Says:

    MH, I am disappointed.

    You failed to incorporate the adjectives happy or lucky in your post.

  128. anon Says:

    Rick, its not – that’s a large party fee. My understanding is that its supposed to be in place of the gratuity. Certainly, the restaurant always has the hope that the tipping party doesn’t notice that they have already added a gratuity.

    We’re talking about them fudging the numbers that you fill in on the tip.

  129. cardinal2007 Says:

    I went to a Peruvian restaurant in the city over Labor Day Weekend, and they charged me a 4% surcharge for the Health SF thing. Anyway I really hate hidden charges and surcharges, so I took the surcharge out of the tip directly, I was ready to give an almost $18 tip, but I instead gave a $14 tip. Yeah, we spent practically $50/person, but we were hungry.

    As a rule of thumb if they mess something up like charging me for something I didn’t get or didn’t order I just take it out of the tip.

    Yeah, I usually give 20%, unless it is bad, then it is 15%, really bad service 10-14%, exceptional service up to 30%, a gratuity gets paid as is, no extra tip.

  130. burbed Says:

    Wow, you folks are big tippers. I start at 15% for ok service.

    Frankly, service at the fast majority of places is just ok. Kind of sad actually.

  131. anon Says:

    I’m about the same as cardinal. 15% is the default and is adjusted accordingly. Certainly, I don’t hesitate to tip poorly if the service is poor. Actually, sometimes putting 10% annoys me but it is rare.

    Cardinal, that’s a bit of an odd way to go about calculating your tip. If you deduct the amount that you were overcharged you from the tip, then you’re effectively moving money from the waiter’s pocket to the restaurant owner’s pocket. Not that I’m particularly sympathetic to either party – just be aware of what you’re doing.

  132. cardinal2007 Says:

    I am quite aware of what I’m doing. The insurance they get anyway, they choose to work at that place, and clearly with $50 meals are clearing good tips on 15% or 20%, anyway.

    If they mess up the order it is clearly the waiter’s fault, not the chef or the restaurant owner. Either way working in the service industry you should be aware that you will be burdened by anything your employer does to annoy the customers, and can choose to go elsewhere, or demand a raise if necessary. That is how the free market works. I choose not to reward underhanded tactics, and at the end how it gets distributed is between the restaurant owner, and the staff.

  133. anon Says:

    Point taken. The amount of money that a waiter or waitress can make blows me away. By working 4 hours a night, 5 nights a week, they can clear what a college graduate makes in a 9-5. That’s ridiculous.

  134. madhaus Says:

    burbed, you ought to try eating in Europe. You will get a keen appreciation of what a great job American restaurants do. My experience is that they cannot be bothered to get the right order to the right person and that you should consider yourself lucky if they actually found your table.

  135. Pralay Says:

    I lived in Paris in my wayward youth. Anyone who can’t find good food there is a complete imbecile. Seriously.
    ———–

    When I read those Paris comments, same thing came to mind. He must be talking about some cheap cafe in front of some tourist spots. And don’t forget he claims he “widely traveled person”. Does not seem so.

  136. Pralay Says:

    Point taken. The amount of money that a waiter or waitress can make blows me away. By working 4 hours a night, 5 nights a week, they can clear what a college graduate makes in a 9-5. That’s ridiculous.
    ——–

    I don’t think it is ridiculous. I can imagine it’s very hard work.

  137. Pralay Says:

    That’s why you should use a check digit in your tip so you know immediately that it’s been changed.
    ———-

    But isn’t it lot easier to write down the tip plus total amount in customer receipt? I always do that and keep all the receipts until credit card statement arrives. I use AmEx card for restaurants and they list down all the tip amounts in restaurant transactions. Anything not within the range of 15-20% is red-flag. Although it never happened.
    Some of my friends always pay tips in cash, although they pay their bills in credit cards. According to them, waiters like it too – because they never have to report it as income if they got it in cash.

  138. madhaus Says:

    KEEP YOUR RECEIPTS? Are you joking?

    It is so much easier to use a check digit to prove they are ripping me off.

    I use AmEx too but eat at too many non-high-end-restaurants (places unwilling to pay AmEx’s 5% fees) so cannot always take advantage.

  139. Pralay Says:

    There was a Thai restaurant in Monterey that charged $10 service fee for party of more than 5, on top of tipping, and they did not write that anywhere or noticed patrons before the bill, I wonder if that is legal.
    ——

    I think that’s good question for Mercury News Action Line. I think they are supposed to mentioned it in menu. However, in most of places they write somewhere bottom or last page of the menu in tiny texts that they are unreadable.

  140. anon Says:

    “I don’t think it is ridiculous. I can imagine it’s very hard work.”

    So tough that their hourly rate should be twice that of an entry level engineer or business grad? You can wait tables without even having completed high school.

    I’ve waited tables before before. I’ve also worked as a cook in a restaurant. Cooking is a far more tiring job, yet you make around 8 an hour. You have to clean the kitchen, and you’re there for hours after the waitstaff leaves. Not only that, you work 8 hours shifts so that you have time to prep and clean up. Waitstaff typically works shifts of 4-5 hours.

    Why aren’t ditch diggers, strawberry pickers and cooks making 40-50 an hour?

  141. cardinal2007 Says:

    Madhaus, now that you’ve published your check sum, they will know how to get past it.

    And will now instead of increasing your bill $1, they will increase $1.08 in your example, or some other situation to make it work. They will know, they see you eating there, and say, there is Madhaus, and Mr. Madhaus, and the Madhaus children, she will leave a 20%, or maybe a 19% tip, but I will adjust it. You have given yourself away unfortunately.

  142. Pralay Says:

    KEEP YOUR RECEIPTS? Are you joking?

    It is so much easier to use a check digit to prove they are ripping me off.
    ——

    Well, even if catch them cheating, you are defenseless without your own receipt. Because bank can ask for it, in case of any dispute. Keeping receipt is not all that difficult. We have a small box and we just dump all the receipts there after coming home. In general we never need to look at them. Only reason we need to check them when we get suspicious. Otherwise, we just throw them away after statement arrives.

  143. anon Says:

    Time to implement a cyclical checksum.

    Maybe:

    date % 5

  144. cardinal2007 Says:

    Security through obscurity only works if you keep it secret. Clearly Madhaus is counting on being anonymous in the internet, at least enough so that the waiter will not overcharge her. What she doesn’t know is that she has given enough information on the internet so that a waiter can identify her or her family by spending only about 12 hrs scouring the internet, or something like that. That’s my guess, I am not speaking in absolutes here.

    The things about the surchages and the cheating on the tip really annoy me because these are things that you would get taken advantage of unless you pay close attention to the bills, and the only way to get it taken off is to call them on it. Clearly they are hoping a good % of customers will fail to do so. It is like hidden fees on anything, and people usually will not go up to any authorities or do a class action suit the vendor simply apologizes and returns the money at that point. But the % that did not complain, that money is pure profit, clean and simple, and sometimes illegal. I find that sort of business tactic to be dishonest.

    Anyway, did we get a new anon at some point, the new anon has a website at 2, whereas the previous one had a website at 1.

  145. anon Says:

    Yes. Anon 2.0

  146. anon Says:

    Just kidding. I changed it for DT.

  147. Pralay Says:

    Clearly they are hoping a good % of customers will fail to do so. It is like hidden fees on anything, and people usually will not go up to any authorities or do a class action suit the vendor simply apologizes and returns the money at that point.
    ———-

    I don’t think it’s limited to restaurant. There is a study that 5-10% items in grocery store is wrongly priced – intentionally or unintentionally. In shelf they show one price but in scanner it comes different.

  148. cardinal2007 Says:

    I had that happen 1 too many times at the bad Safeway, so now I shop at the good Safeway most of the time. Unfortunately the bad Safeway is closer to me, but both are on the way to and from work.

    At one point I became cynical of the bad Safeway, what pissed me off the most was that not only did they make mistakes or “mistakes” but they acted rude when I argued about it with them. Well that was that, and no more bad Safeway. And yeah those are the nicknames, the Safeways down by Stanford had nicknames, so these ones have nicknames too. West Menlo Park (Sharon Heights) Safeway is the “secret Safeway”, Menlo Park Safeway at El Camino, is the “super Safeway” I don’t know about it now that the construction is ongoing, or maybe it is finished I don’t know.

    Anyway, bad Safeway is not bad just because of the service, but that is one of the big reasons. And yes I know it is not only restaurants, many stores do that too, or put labels in the wrong shelf by “mistake”, sorry but I get tired of that BS. Do you job and do it competently enough. To a certain extent I am willing to pay to avoid such things, and such attitudes. I no longer have the time to spend arguing over a dollar or 2 in some cases, but sometimes I will because of the principle of the thing, sometimes I won’t and I will refuse to shop at said locations EVER AGAIN. Yes, I do hold a grudge against a place for life. Once a place has lost my trust it is hard to get back, you have to EARN it.

    I admit I have a few times wavered and gone back to the offending places, but more than 9 out of 10 times it has been a mistake, a big mistake.

    Sometimes I do cheer its ultimate demise, I remember how happy I was when ATA suddenly stopped all operations and ceased being an airline, that was a good day.

  149. RealEstater Says:

    >>Menlo Park Safeway at El Camino, is the “super Safeway” I don’t know about it now that the construction is ongoing, or maybe it is finished I don’t know.

    Finished a long time ago. I love it. It’s the way all grocery stores should be. I refuse to go to a crapppy grocery store, even if it’s closer. Fortunately, Whole Food is the closest store to me.

  150. lurker Says:

    Cardinal, your descriptions of the Safeways make me think of “good twin” and “evil twin.” 🙂 It’s surprising that California doesn’t have price labeling laws. In Michigan every item has to have a price sticker – it’s to protect the consumers and it’s easier to argue at the checkout counter.

    One place in Europe where I found good service: Poland. I would say it’s about on par with the USA.

  151. crossroads Says:

    where is bad safeway vs good safeway?

  152. cardinal2007 Says:

    The Good: 🙂
    Near El Camino and Ralston
    The Bad: 🙁
    On Ralston and Alameda de Las Pulgas
    No ugly, at least as far as I know. 🙂

  153. RealEstater Says:

    Great news! Mortgage rate dropped below 6%. Quote from AP:

    “Private economists had predicted that the government’s move on Sunday to take control of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac would result in lower mortgage rates for consumers because it removed a huge uncertainty about the future of the two firms, which own or guarantee half of the nation’s mortgages.”

    Anybody still feel like laughing at the “all clear for take-off” comment?

    Anybody still predicting market downturn for the rest of this year?

  154. Pralay Says:

    Anybody still feel like laughing at the “all clear for take-off” comment?
    ——

    I would not, if I did not read this one.

    Americans’ appetite for buying homes is likely to remain weak as the U.S. economy slides nearer to recession, weighed down by the deteriorating job market and waning consumer spending.

    “Because the lack of demand is much more related to the fact that we are overhoused means this will probably not be enough to bring about the bottoming of the housing market,” Merrill Lynch economist David Rosenberg said.
    ….
    ….
    Rescuing Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, which together own or guarantee half of all U.S. mortgages, does nothing to “address weakening employment or that banks are increasingly tightening underwriting standards,” Matthew O’Connor of UBS pointed out in a note to clients.

  155. madhaus Says:

    Madhaus, now that you’ve published your check sum, they will know how to get past it.

    And will now instead of increasing your bill $1, they will increase $1.08 in your example, or some other situation to make it work. They will know, they see you eating there, and say, there is Madhaus, and Mr. Madhaus, and the Madhaus children, she will leave a 20%, or maybe a 19% tip, but I will adjust it. You have given yourself away unfortunately.

    cardinal, that is not “my” checksum. The “lucky eight” I showed above is an example of how to use a tipping checksum. Mine is more complex than that because I use both digits in the cents field to indicate what I tipped, but it’s encoded. Remember, there are 10 kinds of people, those who can compute twos-complement on the fly, and those who can’t.

  156. DreamT Says:

    madhaus – I just hope you don’t use checksums and other mathematical tricks when composing a melody or writing lyrics.:)

  157. DreamT Says:

    anon – I do like the result of the upgrade much better.

  158. madhaus Says:

    DreamT, music and math are very closely related, I probably couldn’t write melodies without math. Don’t you remember how many bass players it takes to change a light bulb?

  159. Herve Says:

    Personally, I use MD5 and a salt (always available in restaurants).

  160. DreamT Says:

    madhaus – Answer: none.
    I don’t dispute math is necessary with ratio-nal harmonics and modulo-ation. But checksums and fractional arithmetic? That’s a bit too ‘modern’ to my taste 😛 But I’ll be try and listen to the outcome… once!

  161. nomadic Says:

    Wow, madhaus, I never would’ve guessed you were such a geek. 😉

    That’s a compliment.)

  162. madhaus Says:

    I know a lot of answers to the bass player joke, but in only one is the answer “none.”

  163. Post-modern style meets post-modern price in Los Gatos [Burbed.com] Says:

    […] is one of the few that we ought to look into a house he had built.  So let’s have a look at how this house was marketed back in the early end of the bubble days of 2008, right after the […]

  164. Steve Wozniak’s House for Sale. Again. This time media creams themselves. [Burbed.com] Says:

    […] Wozniak is for sale. For some reason, when it was for sale last year, this did not happen.  We mentioned it, […]

  165. Photopalooza at Wiz Wigwam that Was Woz’s [Burbed.com] Says:

    […] pictures from our onsite visit to Steve Wozniak’s old digs. We’ve already featured this house three times, so we’ll just stick to what we found at the Open House this Sunday.  And of course, […]


Leave a Reply

Please be nice. No name calling, no personal attacks, no racist stuff, no baiting, etc. Let's be nice to each other in the true Bay Area spirit! (Comments may be edited/removed without notice.)