September 17, 2009

Driveway with 4+ car capacity in San Mateo

1953 IVY St, San Mateo, CA 94403 | MLS# 80941349
1953 IVY St San Mateo, CA 94403
Price: $868,000

1953
Beds: 3
Baths: 3
Sq. Ft.: 1,439
$/Sq. Ft.: $603
Lot Size: 4,000 Sq. Ft.
Property Type: Detached Single Family
Stories: 1
Year Built: 1921
Community: Fiesta Gardens
County: San Mateo
MLS#: 80941349
Source: MLSListings
Status: Active
On Redfin: 11 days
Extraordinary Fiesta Gardens home, completely remodeled, large master suite w/ 2 add’l bedroom suites. Detached garage converted to 237 sqft in-law unit (not incl in sqftage), driveway has 4 car capacity. Dramatic kitchen w/ granite counters, stainless apps & handsome cherry cabinetry. All baths have fun, artistic twists of color and textures. Lush gardens accented w/ fruit trees & roses.

Thanks to Burbed reader sonarrat for this find.

What an interesting listing! It has such a fun and festive combination of facts! Let’s take a look at this dramatic kitchen shall we?

1953a

Wow. Stainless steel! Granite! Wow. Very dramatic. I think we should call TNT and let them know about this kitchen, as they claim to know drama. (BTW, what’s that on the wall above the range?)

But let’s face it, the real benefit of this house is the fact that it has a driveway that can fit 4+ cars. With everyone aspiring to be Jay Leno these days, it’s quite easy to rack up a huge number of cars. And, the fact that you can monetize the garage as a rental means that there will be even more cars. Fortunately this house can accommodate it all.

You can probably even rent out part of that driveway for parking spots. Cha-ching!

And at the end of a hard day of work being an entrepreneur, you can go outside to your lush gardens and say “This is all mine (in 40 years).”

Ah.

Comments (67) -- Posted by: burbed @ 5:42 am

67 Responses to “Driveway with 4+ car capacity in San Mateo”

  1. anon Says:

    Pride of ownership!

    You can’t put a price on that.

  2. Evren Says:

    The thing above the range is a pot filler. It’s a faucet above the range for… filling.. pots. It seems ridiculous at first but I guess if your old frail granma is cooking pasta you don’t want her lugging a pot of water from the sink to the range. Or if you’re too busy counting all the equity you’re building to waste time going from the sink to the range…

  3. sonarrat Says:

    I also like how the listing mentions fun and artistic treatments in the bathrooms, and there are no pictures of them. The location under the 82/92 interchange is hot stuff too.

    Of all the things you could buy with $868,000, this may be the least attractive.

  4. burbed Says:

    Wow… I had never heard of a pot filler. That’s pretty neat.

    But wouldn’t it messy if you overfilled the pot? It’s not like there’s a drain there…

  5. SanMatean Says:

    This flippers might come out of this with the shirt on their backs: Last purchased for ~500K in 2008, the pictures look like 50-100K or so was thrown into the place. I’ll bet they need 650 or so to break even.Lucky for them, on the next block over there’s a 2000 sq ft 3/3 listed at 650K (last purchased for $1.17M in 2007!). It’s been sitting since June 1. PWNED.

    This part of San Mateo really leaves me scratching my head. I ride through this area whenever I bike to work, and it always struck me as odd that there are houses here (almost all of the surrounding blocks are filled with warehouses, auto-repair shops, and other service storefronts). I guess it has good access to Caltrain and 92…

  6. nomadic Says:

    exactly, burbed. I always thought pot fillers were a ridiculous yuppie thing. Sure, you fill it easily, but then when your water is boiling hot, you have to lug it across the kitchen to dump it in the sink. Brilliant!

    Then again, I always thought trash compactors were stupid, but now that I have one I wouldn’t want to be without it!

  7. nomadic Says:

    SanMatean – the previous owner was pwned too – he bought it for $649,000 with a $584,100 mortgage. Looks like it must have been a short sale since he only got $512k for it. Downey S&L and Citibank got their share of losses, but mostly Citibank (and the last owner, of course).

  8. bob Says:

    The reason you will want to fit 4 cars is so you can either get your whole family to move in, or find 3 renters to help you pay for the mortgage. Sounds silly, but I swear I see this quite a bit out where I live.

  9. anon Says:

    Pride of ownership and pride of landlordship!

    What a deal. I would imagine pride of ownership is even better when you have 3-4 perfect strangers living in your house.

    Only then is the house really “yours.”

  10. steve Says:

    pot fillers are staples in commercial kitchens, hence the appearance in remodels over the last decade. the benefit isn’t so much on the initial fill (although they are convenient for that), but in the ease of adding water to an already boiling pot. a restaurant will keep one boiling for hours for pasta and the water level tends to get a touch low if you don’t replenish.

    of course, if a restaurant does it, a serious home chef can’t be without it.

  11. nomadic Says:

    The driveway must take up a large part of the lot – it’s only 4,000sf to begin with.

  12. bob Says:

    Yes… a serious chef in this kitchen will not want to turn around and fill the pot at the sink even though the sink is actually closer than the pot filler.

  13. anon Says:

    A pot filler….above the sink directly over a pot… is somehow closer than a sink which is in the other counter…

    Hm.

    Must be one of those rounding errors..

  14. anon Says:

    Er, I mean “above the stove”

  15. bob Says:

    I was being more than sarcastic, but still- if you need a “pot filler” its probably because you actually work in a huge kitchen and running to the other side of the room to get more water would be a pain. But this kitchen is the size of a pantry. Its just stupid gimicky wannabe chef bullshit.

  16. BuyersAreIdiots Says:

    Considering it has a pot filler and a large driveway to handle multiple vehicles kind of makes me thing this used to be some restaurant or catering company that was in this thing.

  17. A. Lewis Says:

    Hey, if you have 12 roommates, you cook a LOT of pasta at once, in a VERY big pot. I don’t want to carry that pot even 2 feet. Pot filler = good.

    And you don’t drain it at all. You scoop out the pasta when it’s done, and add more water the next meal.

    Repeat.
    ????
    Profit!

  18. A. Lewis Says:

    Maybe I should put it in the older San Mateo thread, but I’m not the only one who thinks there are market pressures that could cause the mid and high end homes to further decrease in price:

    DQ CA Bay Area Sales Decline – another excellent post by Calculated Risk.

    A few money quotes:

    Sales fell the most – 21.1 percent – between July and August in Santa Clara County.

    And the shift back to more low end homes – even with the lower foreclosure inventory in the low end areas – is a bad sign for the mid-to-high end of the housing market. This suggest prices will fall further in those areas.

    Please read it – there is much more.

    Something I’ve talked about (though it’s been many months) is how this stuff happens in patterns – and the MRBA and RBA is just naturally later in following the pattern. Now we’re getting to the part late in it where sales dry up at the high-end…actually they’ve been doing this for a while, but there is overlaid some of the seasonal home-buying…I think it will be a very cold winter for RBA home sales – unless they drop prices like mad.

    If that happens, people will flood in to snap up things in the best neighborhoods – but only at a discount.

  19. A. Lewis Says:

    #16 – nah, it’s just opulence in a SFH. I have a rich relative with the same setup (driveway and pot filler) on the east coast. Rarely are more than 4 people eating together, (or even in the house), but well-off people like this stuff.

    I would love to be able to afford a lot so large I could waste lots of sq. footage on a curved driveway where you can drive in and drive out without backing up. Even better – it’s two cars wide so you can go around your wife’s Porsche – again with no reverse-annoyance. That’s nice.

    I think the pot-filler might keep me awake at night a little bit – there is no drain – so what if it’s leaking? What if one of the kids turns it on when I’m not around? {shudder}

  20. bob Says:

    I used to sell upper end hardware for cabinets, doors, and bathrooms. We’re talking $2,000 for just the doorknobs, hinges, locks, and handles for an entry door. The door of course was made of solid mahogany dredged out of the rain forest ( which was ironic since so many of the customers drive Priuses back when they were new and hot with the richy-rich crowd). Nevermind that some of it was just pot metal with a nice brass plating or that it was made in China. Nope- as you mentioned rich people just eat this stuff up. Personally I always thought it was a waste of money. A good ole’ Schlage lockset will do you just fine.

  21. steve Says:

    bob, something we finally agree on 😉 schlage is excellent

    a lewis 16, add a leak detector to your home security system

    a lewis 15, I followed your link, and the meat of the post is a quote from the DQ President:

    “Part of the mid-summer pause in the market could have been caused by home shoppers becoming frustrated by market conditions they didn’t anticipate. In many areas there were fewer homes, especially cheap foreclosures, to choose from, and lots of talk about multiple offers and all-cash deals.

    “There are ongoing reports of mortgage delinquencies rising, yet the number of homes being foreclosed on has trended down lately. It’s bred a lot of uncertainty among the pundits and the public about how many more foreclosures are coming, when they’ll hit, and what impact they’ll have on prices.”

    In general, our differences are ones of degree, but, to put them most sharply, you think:

    1) Palo Alto and Silver Creek are more connected than I do
    2) your strong belief is that RBA prices formed in response to a credit bubble. I feel they have more to do with wealth (not necessarily income) creation in general. NINJA loans aren’t coming back for a while, but DJIA at 10K seems right around the corner. [obviously, a drop back to 6K would cause our views to align rather quickly]

  22. A. Lewis Says:

    21 – well stated, steve.

    FWIW, I’m of the opinion the current equities rally is unfounded optimism, and P/E ratios are seriously out of whack.

    But I’ve been wrong before.

    It would be good for the economy if I was wrong (mostly).

    If everyone else could win, and I had to be stuck renting forever, I’d be content. The needs of the many outweight the needs of the few. Or the one.

    (But I think I’m right). 🙂

  23. A. Lewis Says:

    Outweigh! Darn, I wish we could edit our posts…

  24. A. Lewis Says:

    I can’t help but add, I think there may be more to the piece than what you cited. The quote contains “could have been caused”. I think there are other reasons besides.

    Like some of the potential buyers thought the homes were just plain worth less now.

  25. nomadic Says:

    bob (#20) – you make a funny point. It’s like on those dumb house hunting shows that I sometimes catch while semi-comatose. They’ll have a couple looking for a “green” home, but it has to be quite large (for just two people), or they pick brand new construction because the appliances are Energy Star rated. Hell, if they really want to help the environment, buy a small energy-waster and upgrade it. Then you’re adding another “green” house to the world. 🙂

    And you’re right about Schlage, as long as it’s the line made in the USA. They have a cheap version made in China. The locksmith gave me an earful the last time I used one.

  26. steve Says:

    a lewis 24, I think I quoted the entirety of the explanatory section. I agree there is more to the “story” but it is not in the post.

  27. anon Says:

    “Its just stupid gimicky wannabe chef bullshit.”

    It sure is, bob. It sure is.

  28. Pralay Says:

    I feel they have more to do with wealth (not necessarily income) creation in general.
    —–

    But it would interesting to see how far the “wealth” can take when the owner with $1.4M mortgage (variable rate) can neither rent nor sell.

  29. nomadic Says:

    sweet, Pralay – only $24k moves you in!

    But it sure beats coming up with almost $800k for the 20% down payment.

  30. bob Says:

    Its been 7 years since I sold hardware and even back then Schlage was migrating their manufacturing to overseas. That’s when we started getting Chinese versions with plastic barrels which meant that they would basically wear themselves out over time. Baldwin was the upper end that we sold along with Emtek. Both of these were also starting to become a mainly Chinese manufactured item.

    I actually used to make keys and re-key locks when I lived on the East Coast. Many of the locks came out of apartment buildings that were 100 years old. The locks were often as old as the buildings. Imagine people coming in and out of the front door- 50 people per building, every day all day for 100 years. That’s how much use these locks got and often all I did was replace the worn-out pins, give them a bit of graphite and wallah- good for another 10-15 years.

    Now pretty much all of it- even the “good” stuff is crap. Its just that some of it is more expensive crap.

    In regards to the current overly optimistic rally of late, its pretty easy to make what just a few months ago was an awful situation sound or look better.

    There’s a few things I find kind of troubling. First of all, there could be some truth in what Steve mentioned: Foreclosures suddenly created actual realistic purchasing opportunities for buyers. But non-foreclosed homes have not come down enough to warrant enough interest. Consumers are weary of housing bubble environments and as soon as the talk of “multiple offers” began, people probably lost their appetites.

    So basically there’s a situation where despite the initial cuts, home prices- especially in prime areas- are still too high and too much for consumers now all to aware of the financial risks. I’ll put it this way: Homes in my area were around 650k at the peak. Now after some cuts they are maybe 550k. To me its like- really? is that all? So people like me refuse to believe that the current prices are permanent and with recent declines its just as realistic to assume that with more waiting the prices will correct further. It doesn’t matter to me since I’m using headhunters to get me out of here and to another city. But if I were interested in buying, the prices are too high.

    I think that situation exists on both coasts and the other highly populated, pricey locales. On the other hand I have been reading about the surge of growth in cities like Atlanta, Houston, and a few other cities off the radar. So its possible that while they are not at this point bubble cities, they along with other now-classic alternative relocation cities will become the next surge of growth. Its entirely possible that the housing market and economy could recover minus places like the Bay Area, which could stagnate for years while other cities take on high growth positions. The coastal cities during the last boom headed up the bubble, so perhaps the next cities will be inward instead.

  31. steve Says:

    hmmm, 2 comments on pralay’s #28 were “eated” last night. 3rd time’s the charm?

    quickly, the purchaser of the can’t sell, can’t rent house paid ~1.8M in 2003 (best guess frm the current assessment), so 400K down and a 1.4M loan. they “updated” — let’s call it 100K max.

    now, I am liking the bold $1500/sq ft price tag the owner/agent (yes, they are the same) has hung on it, but even at $3M she makes a killing. look at the sat map; there is no way this doesn’t sell for at least $3M and likely more. the only question is how long does she stick to her wishing price.

    she obviously thinks the market is back and only getting better or she wouldn’t float the rental for mortgage cost. if I were her, I’d take the first $3.2 offer and move on.

  32. zanon Says:

    STEVE: Arguing that RBA pricing is due to wealth generation and not a credit bubble means that the housing run-up here, which coincided exactly with the housing run-up across the rest of the planet earth, was for a different reason.

    It’s possible, I guess, but to me sounds like another burbed punchline: “things really are different in the RBA!”

    The decimation of non-RBA means there is no move-up equity for the RBA. Although there were no subprime mortgages here, there were downpayment fueled by subprime activity outside the RBA. RE says “buy outside of RBA and move-up to RBA”. That actually would have worked in 2000-2004. But those days are gone.

    A good equity environment does not pose well for real estate, although banks, and the Fed, have been on a long campaign trying to convince people that “what’s good for Wall Street is good for Main Street”. And today we have 10% unemployment and rising, with Wall Street making higher profits than they were in 2007. Still, I guess some people want to believe Banksters over their own lying eyes.

    Real estate is debt financed, and that financing needs to come out of incomes. Low incomes right now are fueling corporate profits. Does not take much to put two and two together.

  33. steve Says:

    zanon, I agree with some of what you wrote, but your opening paragraph is just wrong. check these 3 charts and get back to me:

    LA prestige http://www.firstrepublic.com/lend/residential/prestigeindex/losangeles.html

    SD prestige
    http://www.firstrepublic.com/lend/residential/prestigeindex/sandiego.html

    SF prestige
    http://www.firstrepublic.com/lend/residential/prestigeindex/sanfrancisco.html

    they look pretty different

  34. Pralay Says:

    they look pretty different
    —-

    Different in what sense? I see two basic difference with LA and SD.
    1. LA and SD 1989 bubble was lot bigger than SF.
    2. In SF there is a dip after dot-com bust.

    Except these two, they look pretty much same, especially from 2004 to till today.

  35. steve Says:

    yes, the 2004 to 2009 similarities are striking. the sharp difference are in the 2001-2006, the era of easy money. LA doubles, SD double, SF up (only) 30%. if the RBA story is all about easy money, why didn’t it cause a 100% increase here too?

  36. Pralay Says:

    It has been one month since the “forward looking” statement about unemployment was made. Looks like unemployment is really “on the way down, not up”. RealEstater is right again. History has a way of repeating itself.

  37. Pralay Says:

    yes, the 2004 to 2009 similarities are striking. the sharp difference are in the 2001-2006, the era of easy money. LA doubles, SD double, SF up (only) 30%. if the RBA story is all about easy money, why didn’t it cause a 100% increase here too?
    —-

    That’s easy to explain. In SF bubble came early – some of them due to legitimate reasons (e.g. job growth, stock options from solid hitech companies) and some of them due to funny money in dot-com. Then came dot-com bust and so did the dip in housing market from late 2001 to early 2003. Eventually SD and LA caught up with SF at 2004. Basically, 2001 as baseline is wrong because in 2001 home price in SF was already way up compare to LA and SD. That’s why you see only 30%.

  38. steve Says:

    pralay, I find your comments insightful, but you are losing me here.

    I write that RBA is more asset (bubble) driven than credit bubble. concluding that things will unwind in different ways for different reasons. (of course I still recognize interconnectedness, just not to the degree others postulate).

    zanon, in a very good post, says non-sense. it is too big a coincidence for my asset bubble to exactly overlap with the rest of the country’s credit bubble.

    I present relevant price tier information that shows that the timing was rather different.

    you suggest I am wrong in a post (37) that explains that the causes and timing were different. so, I’m confused.

    you are a google-master, what do 10 and 20 year city inventory charts look like for the RBA? I know things are piling up now, but, according to the credit bubble theory, sales should have been much higher than normal 2001-2007. were they in the RBA?

  39. Pralay Says:

    zanon, in a very good post, says non-sense. it is too big a coincidence for my asset bubble to exactly overlap with the rest of the country’s credit bubble.

    I present relevant price tier information that shows that the timing was rather different.

    you suggest I am wrong in a post (37) that explains that the causes and timing were different. so, I’m confused.
    ——

    zanon talked about run-up in due to credit bubble, although he did not specifically mentioned about 2004-2007 period. Secondly, he did not claim that all areas in bubble period are going to appreciate in equal amount. Some area it will be 100%, some area 80% and some area 50%. So arguing why SF went only 30% and LA/SD went 100% in same period is pointless. The fact is that there is indeed impact of easy credit in SF – even in prestige tier. Otherwise, how do you explain 30% in 2004-2007 period?

    My argument is that SF had only 30% increase in same period because this area already saw some “rapid” appreciation before 2001. Balloon was already inflated quite a bit in 2001 for SF – for wrong reason or right reason. So when 2004 arrived, it had less room for credit bubble. Timing for credit bubble is still same in LA, SD, SF. But what LA and SD lacked is a preceding mini-bubble due to dot-com. That’s why measuring the magnitude of bubble 2001 as baseline is incorrect.

  40. Pralay Says:

    you are a google-master, what do 10 and 20 year city inventory charts look like for the RBA? I know things are piling up now, but, according to the credit bubble theory, sales should have been much higher than normal 2001-2007. were they in the RBA?
    —–

    Looking for this kind of chart?

    For example, in Palo Alto. The highest August inventory years: 2001(119), 2002(127), 2003(110).
    This year Aug inventory: 105. This year also lowest number of Aug sale (27).

  41. zanon Says:

    STEVE: Your prestige tiers don’t look that different to me. As Pralay says, the 90s slump were smaller here, and then there was the .com runup (peak in ’01).

    From ’98-08:
    Prices tripled in RBA (with a hiccup)
    Prices doubled in SD
    Prices went up 2.5x in LA

    Don’t stop in California, look at house prices in any other state from 98-08, or in the UK, Germany, France, etc. Japan did not act in the bubble as it had its in the 80s and is still deflating away.

  42. steve Says:

    zanon, have you forgotten what you wrote:

    Arguing that RBA pricing is due to wealth generation and not a credit bubble means that the housing run-up here, which coincided exactly with the housing run-up across the rest of the planet earth, was for a different reason.

    doesn’t really matter, but I am surprised you are arguing that the valley did not get significantly wealthier, both absolutely and *relatively* over this period.

    maybe you can define what you mean by a “credit bubble”? perhaps you mean low interest rates in general which led to outsized stock market gains, large VC funds and significant investments in startups which, in turn, created jobs, IPOs, M&A activity and entirely new industries? when I think credit bubble, I’m talking NINJA loans, option ARMs, cash-out REFIs, 0 down and flip fever.

  43. Real Estater Says:

    Pralay says,

    >>For example, in Palo Alto. The highest August inventory years: 2001(119), 2002(127), 2003(110).
    This year Aug inventory: 105. This year also lowest number of Aug sale (27).

    Obviously, there is only one explanation: Palo Alto is no longer desirable. Move-up buyers from Santa Clara have stopped coming.

  44. Pralay Says:

    Obviously, there is only one explanation: Palo Alto is no longer desirable.
    —–

    Is it so? ONLY one explanation? And that is also logic-impaired.

  45. nomadic Says:

    Move-up buyers from Santa Clara have stopped coming.

    There’s the true part. The move up buyers don’t have the equity to buy into PA (or other RBA cities) now.

  46. zanon Says:

    Steve: I use every day definition. I don’t think low interest rates lead to “outsized stock market gains, large VC funds and significant investments in startups which, in turn, created jobs, IPOs, M&A activity and entirely new industries?”, I think the .com boom was a combination of genuine new wealth creation and an asset bubble, which popped. This is not a controversial position.

    “NINJA loans, option ARMs, cash-out REFIs, 0 down and flip fever” and very low interest rates created a credit bubble which fueled housing across the planet earth.

    The wealth of RBA should show up in rents, and it does not. Rents are high relative to other places, but crazy low and getting lower by the standards of local house prices now, and in the recent past.

    Silicon Valley existed long before the internet, and plenty of millionaire creating companies were here creating millionaires long before 1998.

    But if you want to act as if history began in 1998, and buying a $1M house that you an rent for $2K makes sense, go right ahead. You’ll have plenty of company with RE on this board, and REAgents in real life.

    NOMADIC: Chuckie is getting closer, but still no cigar. There ARE NO move up buyers from Santa Clara, or anywhere else.

    http://mhanson.com/archives/236

    If homeowners can’t sell for enough to pay a Realtor 6%, extract the down on the new property, and pay for moving costs they are effectively in a negative equity position. Homeowners know this — a homeowner that has only 15% equity knows they are trapped in their house…

    The 2.5% sales number also highlights how devastating the Jumbo Prime, Pay Option and Alt-A implosions and subsequent foreclosure waves will be on the market even if it is kicked down the road through mortgage mod initiatives. Where are the buyers going to come from? Supply is already out of control in the mid-to-upper price bands. Unlike the low end of the market that is so hot today, investors won’t be in there buying a $600k house because they know the buyers are far and few in between. In addition, with mid-to-high end rents tumbling the cap rates make it prohibitive.”

  47. Real Estater Says:

    It’s understandable that folks without sufficient earning potential are typically full of negativity. However, it’s important to take a step back and assess the situation from a neutral perspective. The stock market is looking 6 months ahead and it clearly sees a bright outlook. The Dow is near 10,000 now and appears heading for 12,000. A lot of people have made money in this run-up, and some of that will inevitably make its way into real estate. Unemployment is plateauing right now, which signals it’s on the way down. Warren Buffet and Ben Bernanke both say the recession is likely over, so I’m just wondering, what’s up with the negativity?

  48. Pralay Says:

    The stock market is looking 6 months ahead and it clearly sees a bright outlook.
    —–

    Actually we were all clear to take-off exactly one year back when gas price settled and Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac problem. Let’s not talk about “seeing” bright outlook. We are already past that phase.

  49. Pralay Says:

    so I’m just wondering, what’s up with the negativity?
    —–

    RealEstater is like all the optimist characters in Disneyland. He just wonders and wonders and wonders why so much negativity in this world. He wonders…he wonders….he wonders….

  50. Pralay Says:

    However, it’s important to take a step back and assess the situation from a neutral perspective.
    —–

    Guys,

    RealEstater, the the neutral guy, who used to post news items floating all over the media, IS BAAAAAAAAAAACK. He did not post on Burbed since October 2008. We are happy to get him back. This time, as usual, he again came up with “neutral perspective”. Let’s have some neutral perpective with a biased towards “bright outlook” (no negativity, ok?).

  51. Pralay Says:

    Unemployment is plateauing right now, which signals it’s on the way down.
    ——-

    Definitely plateauing.

    California’s unemployment rate jumped to 12.2 percent in August – the highest on record dating to 1976 – up from 11.9 percent in July, as nearly 2.25 million state residents looked for work in vain.

  52. Pralay Says:

    A lot of people have made money in this run-up, and some of that will inevitably make its way into real estate.
    —-

    Yes, definitely some money will make its way into RBA real estate. Keep your finger crossed, RealEstater…..without negativity…..and with neutral perspective.

  53. nomadic Says:

    Always look on the bright side of life!

  54. Real Estater Says:

    Pralay,

    If you understand economics the unemployment rate should not be a surprise. It’s a lagging indicator which should be at its worst right now. Things will get better in about 6 months. The problem with you is that you don’t have any foresight, as a result you’re always behind the curve on everything.

  55. Real Estater Says:

    nomadic,

    Do your own thinking instead of being mislead by Pralay. I am far from always being positive. Last year I was the first to sell my stocks. I then warned that “the theater is on fire”.

  56. anon Says:

    You are an incredible bore, real estater.

  57. Pralay Says:

    If you understand economics the unemployment rate should not be a surprise. It’s a lagging indicator which should be at its worst right now.
    —–

    Let’s not talk about “worst”. You have too much negativity. I thought unemployment should be “on the way down”.

  58. Pralay Says:

    Things will get better in about 6 months.
    ——-

    Yes, “bright outlook” is always in future.
    1. All clear to take-off.
    2. Good news

    3. Good news

    And these are all from “neutral perspective” guy….without any negativity. 🙂

  59. Pralay Says:

    I am far from always being positive. Last year I was the first to sell my stocks.
    —–

    Yes, far away from being positive. In March 2008:

    If you look at the stock market, the DOW and Nasdaq are still at very respectable levels. We just heard Feb home sales is up. There’s is no unemployment issue in the BA, and there’s no housing crash to speak of.

    That’s from “neutral perspective” guy….without any negativity. 🙂

  60. Top Dog Says:

    Burbed: It’s about time you step in and stop the guy from further littering.

    Everyone else: Let the thread die.

  61. Pralay Says:

    Rescue Dog is back.

  62. Pralay Says:

    #53, hilarious. It’s Sunday. Let the thread die, stop trash-taking and negativity. Go out and buy some homes. Someone is waiting for commissions. Always look on the bright side of life!

  63. anon Says:

    Woof woof…..whimper whimper.

    Just like real estater. Full of talk then runs to momma.

  64. Pralay Says:

    Full of talk then runs to momma.
    —–

    Well, apart from all the woof-woofs, whining about “littering” and “very low quality crowd” are Top Dog’s the funniest acts.

  65. Real Estater Says:

    All,

    Please focus on rational discussions. Thanks for your cooperation.

  66. Pralay Says:

    Please focus on rational no-negative discussions from neutral perspective. 🙂

  67. Top Dog Says:

    I agree with you, Real Estater!


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Please be nice. No name calling, no personal attacks, no racist stuff, no baiting, etc. Let's be nice to each other in the true Bay Area spirit! (Comments may be edited/removed without notice.)