December 29, 2009

Troyer the Tireless Realtor

Thanks to Burbed reader Herve for sending this in.

 troyer1

troyer2

You’ve gotta admit, this is pretty… uh… different.

If you were a real estate agent, how would you differentiate and advertise yourself?

Comments (33) -- Posted by: burbed @ 5:00 am

33 Responses to “Troyer the Tireless Realtor”

  1. RinkRat Says:

    ….and Realtards wonder why nobody has any respect for their industry.

    It certainly differentiates this particular agent, but not in a good way.

  2. nomadic Says:

    I’m sure David’s mother always assured him he was “special.”

  3. Los Altos IS Special Says:

    This turd has been floating for some time.

    We used to laugh heartily at his mailers in local Los Altos bars and eatreies where most of the patrons were useless, unemployable (except as realwhores-used house peddlers)housewifes looking for something-for-nothing or a new down payment on another, wealthier, husband. For a real Rogues Gallery of real estate losers, pick up a copy of the Town Crier/real estate cartel sheet for a real belly laugh.. . especially those peddlers touting their Ph.Ds’. Get a doctorate to hawk used houses – Bwa ha ha

    Goes to show, nobody stoops lower than a realtard.

    Nobody.

  4. Los Altos IS Special Says:

    Why not leave Santa Troyer a heartwarming Holiday e-mail message to let him know how much you value his profession and how it has helped America?

    Better yet, call for an appointment with Santa and then deal instead with another elf… Just Sayin

    Your Welcome.

  5. nomadic Says:

    Case-Shiller data says we’re at fall 2003 prices nationwide. More interestingly, it says the SF region is up only 35% from 2000 – much less than our “sworn enemy” New York, and even less than Boston. Hell, the index is better in Tampa! Here’s the data:

    http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2009/12/29/a-look-at-case-shiller-by-metro-area-december-update/

    In other news, the UMM and DMM ETFs have ceased trading. You may recall these were the funds that were supposed to track the housing market, but there turned out to be very little interest in them. I’m a little surprised the DMM (for downward trends) didn’t fare better than it did.

  6. waiting_for_the_fall Says:

    One year I got a CD of Christmas songs in the mail with the realtors smiling faces on it. Horrible.

  7. DreamT Says:

    I can’t wait for the viral Troyer video on youtube.

  8. nomadic Says:

    Do you suppose he’s related to Verne?

  9. bob Says:

    Top 5 healthiest housing markets are all in TX. No.6 is Raleigh, no.11 is Nashville.

    http://www.builderonline.com/local-markets/the-healthiest-housing-markets-for-2009.aspx?page=11

  10. nomadic Says:

    “Healthy” in terms of new building…

  11. bob Says:

    Yes- new building. But I recall earlier in the year that Pulte homes bought Centex. The reason they did so was that Centex owns vast chunks of land in both TX and NC. Why would they be so interested in these areas? Growth.

    http://articles.latimes.com/2009/apr/09/business/fi-homebuilders9

    Additionally, another article showed that the fastest growing cities were also both in TX and NC. So put 2 and 2 together and you can pretty much assume that some of the more aggressive growth will be happening in these two states.Let’s just call TX the “New California” because that’s what it has become. In the case of Austin, it added almost 20,000 jobs last year. That’s totally the opposite of just about anywhere in the state of California. I’ve mentioned before to some of the real estate wannabe investors on here that if you really and truly want to invest somewhere that’s more likely to have real returns, then these 2 states are probably your best bet.

  12. Herve Estater Says:

    > Let’s just call TX the “New California” because that’s what it has become.

    So you’re saying the state you’re so eager to move to is turning into the state you dislike so much?

  13. nomadic Says:

    The “New California” will be better because bob can buy a place there before he gets priced out foreverrrrrrrrrrr! Who cares about the people late to the party?

    ;-)

    How is the new job, by the way? Have you started yet, bob?

  14. anon Says:

    And suddenly bob will wish for prop 13.

  15. Herve Estater Says:

    > I can’t wait for the viral Troyer video on youtube.

    Since you cannot wait:

    Contemporary-Styled Home with Sweeping Bay Views!

    Exceptional New Construction Just Moments from The Village

    Wonderful Two-Story Mediterranean on a Private Street

  16. bob Says:

    New job starts soon. When it does you probably won’t see me on here much at all anymore. ( so you all can breathe a collective sigh of relief)

    But anyway, the term “New California” in my opinion refers to a period in California that lasted from the 1950’s to maybe the mid to late 1970’s. A 20 year period when the state had an explosive period of growth in population, economic development and activity, and so forth. At the same time since it was at that point still reasonable for middle class families, the quality of life was generally better. I talk to quite a few older people who concur.

    TX is in many ways similar to 1950’s California. Its huge, has a spread of cities, and has a diversified economy based in everything from defense, energy, medical, tech, education, and finance. At this point its also still affordable to middle class families. Put two and two together and you have the makings of a new economic superpower state along the lines of California. Meanwhile as the above story mentioned, more people moved out of CA than moved in. As long as prices are as they are here, I’d expect that trend to continue.

    As far as “wishing for prop 13″, well TX also has fairly high property taxes. That means a 200k house would have something like a $4,500 tax bill due every year, and what’s more, this tax is progressive. When we visited, we met a few people who actually wished their homes were worth LESS due to taxes alone. In other words there is a consequence for higher home prices that keeps those prices in check versus CA where there’s no consequence at all. So I actually fully support the progressive tax system in TX. Take that away and you’ll have the same problems CA has had. After seeing the crippling effect its had on this state, no other state in their right mind would dare consider anything close to prop 13.

    Nomadic. Lay of the smileys.

  17. nomadic Says:

    Is there a ration of smileys? I only used one in this thread. Until now. :-) :-P ;-) :-) :-P ;-) :-) :-P ;-) :-) :-P ;-) :-) :-P ;-) :-) :-P ;-) :-) :-P ;-) :-) :-P ;-) :-) :-P ;-) :-) :-P ;-) :-) :-P ;-) :-) :-P ;-) :-) :-P ;-) :-) :-P ;-) :-) :-P ;-) :-) :-P ;-) :-) :-P ;-) :-) :-P ;-) :-) :-P ;-)

    In other words there is a consequence for higher home prices that keeps those prices in check versus CA where there’s no consequence at all.

    No consequence? How about the retiree paying $1,500/year who sells his place to the new owner who pays $15,000/year? Seems to me that adding $1,000/month or more to a new house payment for taxes ought to put a damper on the excitement, no?

  18. burbed Says:

    Seems to me that adding $1,000/month or more to a new house payment for taxes ought to put a damper on the excitement, no?

    Not to the seller who probably voted for Prop 13 in the first place.

  19. nomadic Says:

    Doesn’t matter. The issue is whether or not the buyer is willing to buy and fork over the cash. I’d think it would keep prices in check a little bit, but apparently there hasn’t been much of that effect.

    …OR, maybe if we got the old people to pay their fair share, prices could go back to 7%/year appreciation that we rightfully deserve in the RBA!

  20. DreamT Says:

    “Is there a ration of smileys?”

    bob is allergic to happy feelings

  21. SiO2 Says:

    “I’ve mentioned before to some of the real estate wannabe investors on here that if you really and truly want to invest somewhere that’s more likely to have real returns, then these 2 states are probably your best bet.”

    One drawback of investing in TX would be that there’s less restrictions on building, physical and legal. In the Peninsula, one side is bounded by water (physical restriction, please ignore the bay landfill for now). Mountain side has legal restrictions on building. (physical too, if you consider landslides). So the amount of land available for building is constrained and therefore more expensive.

    In TX it’s fairly flat – even the Hill Country is not exactly the Himalayas or even the Santa Cruz Mtns. And they take more of a laissez faire attitude about zoning. So the buildable land is not as constrained, therefore less opportunity for appreciation.

    Sure, this sounds like “they aren’t building more land”. But there’s some fact to it too.

  22. bob Says:

    SiO2,
    I disagree with you. TX is in many ways like California. It has a city like Austin, which tends to be more upscale and expensive ( By TX standards). Austin has had fairly consistent appreciation for the better part of 25 years. Additionally, let’s say that you buy a fixer-upper in Austin for $76,000 ( yes, there are homes that cheap there)

    http://austin.craigslist.org/reb/1531722490.html

    Assume a $10,000 down payment plus the extended $8,000 tax credit that’s continuing to weasel money out of our pockets. The monthly payment would be $338.00. Throw in a rough estimate of around $2,000 in annual property taxes and you get a monthly expenditure of $500 a month total payments. Looks like homes in the round rock area rent for anywhere from $600-$900 a month for this size. So assume you rent for the median of $700 or so. That means you pocket $200 a month total. The Austin housing market did not overinflate like the bubble cities nor did it deflate much either. The name of the game there is steady growth, albeit not as dramatic as the Bay Area, but then again there is less risk. Just steady, reliable income.Let me put it another way. My parents owned 2 rental homes back in TN. Save the mountains an hour away there were no bodies of water and I can assure you there’s no such thing as zoning either. Both homes were bought in the 90’s for $20k and 35k respectfully. They both rented for around $450-$500 a month. They not only made money each month, but they sold them last year for around $100k each, or approximately $150k in outright profit. If you’re going to invest in real estate, its wise to do so if A: You can monetize from the start and B: there is consistent appreciation. Lastly, its supposed to be a long-term investment, much like stocks are supposed to be. If you’re jumping in it for a get-rich-quick investment, then you’ll more likely lose your shirt.

    Personally I think investing in real estate is stupid. There are better, more efficient ways to grow your savings. But if I had the desire to invest in it, these cities is where I would do so.

    In cities like Raleigh, and many of the other second tier up and coming cities, they have much in common with each other. They are both college towns. They both have growing tech and in the case of Raleigh, pharmaceutical industries. They both have median home prices inline with their local incomes. They are both growing. They both have younger average populations. Neither suffered from having dramatic bubble inflation and deflation.They are ideal places for people and families in terms of the environments they have which in turn fosters positive, consistent economic prosperity.

    But to get to the bottom of this, I’ve mentioned numerous times that the US is a migratory country. People tend to have fairly basic needs: Jobs, affordable housing, and the need for functioning infrastructure such as roads, schools, and so on. Perhaps cities like Austin and Raleigh are sprawly and lacking in strict zoning. But seeing as how so many people are migrating to these places its clear that people would rather have affordable housing rather than restrictions on zoning.

    So again- put it all together and its obvious where the growth in this country is going to be heading. California had its day. A good 40 to 50 year run. Sure- it’ll probably still hold the seat of innovation and economic power for awhile longer. But I fail to see how the state can stem the flow of its young professionals as long as the laws and regulations are in place that cause housing prices and the general cost of living to be as much as it is. I know that might sound incredulous to most of you here with firm anchors in place. But I don’t think I’m that far from the mark and again, almost all of the people I know my age are as equally fed up as I am.

    Anyway, soon you won’t have to read my meanderings any longer so you can go back to talking about real estate and how wonderful California is.

  23. Real Estater Says:

    Bob says,
    >>But I fail to see how the state can stem the flow of its young professionals as long as the laws and regulations are in place that cause housing prices and the general cost of living to be as much as it is.

    All you need to do is look in the mirror. You wanted to leave, but stayed due to a job opportunity here. Texas failed to make you move, despite all of your big talk.

  24. bob Says:

    RE,
    I’ve already explained my position on my choice. My choice has nothing to do with the opportunities here or elsewhere.

  25. Herve Estater Says:

    > let’s say that you buy a fixer-upper in Austin for $76,000

    The house you list is in Round Rock, TX (20 miles from Austin). Using your logic (or lack thereof) I can say houses in Los Altos Hills are dirt cheap.

  26. steve Says:

    bob, in general, I think your point about the impact of high cost of living on domestic migration and the tech economy has merit. however, I’d remind you that “everyone” has been moving to oregon, nevada, texas, etc and out of CA for the last 30 years, the era you refer to as the now-over golden age.

    if you want a real measure of future economic potential, follow the money: VC and IPO. both have been scarce of late but that could change with a few high-profile events. here’s a good list of companies to watch:

    http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/12/24/top-ten-ipo-candidates-2010/

    add in some clean tech and maybe a bio-tech breakthrough or two, and those predicting the death of the valley will look as silly this time as they did in 1992.

  27. bob Says:

    Round Rock is the largest bedroom community in Austin. I know because we drove past it one morning and the freeway leading to the city was jam-packed. Its also the fastest growing city in the US, with Cary, NC ( A bedroom community to Raleigh and the tech triangle area) in 2nd place.

    Steve,
    Sure- there’s been people moving out of CA for decades. But for the past several years, more have been moving out than in, a reversal of the past 4-5 decades. I think the latest housing bubble was what did it. So far prices here have not fallen to low enough levels to be acceptable for just about any family not making at least 100k combined, which even still is a fairly large majority of the region. I also think this will be a progressive migration. It started with those in the middle class and its now starting to affect younger professionals like myself.

    In regards to holding your breath for some sort of miraculous tech or biotech boom in the valley again, well back in 1992 the Valley still could freely state that it had a dominant position in tech with the lion’s share of brainpower. Basically if you wanted to work in tech, you had to come to the Valley. Tech and Biotech are now fractured. There are plenty of tech start ups in just about every major US city from Salt Lake City,to Austin, Atlanta, Dallas, and all the others inbetween. Secondly, back in 1992 there was hardly a thing as the internet. Now its an everyday tool and it has helped create a more mobile workforce.

    Lastly, while the Bay Area used to have a privileged position in regards to having culture, food, art, music, and so on, A lot of other cities have caught up and perhaps even surpassed the Bay Area in that regard. All of the major cities in my home state now all have wine bars, microbreweries, fine dining, and raid increases in the types of ethnic groups moving in. I hardly recognize my own home town, which 10 years ago was a sleepy, boring city. Last time I was there, all 4 music venues were sold out and people were waiting out the door at most resturaunts. Its become clear to people that they can not only get an affordable house elsewhere, but also enjoy the same things that used to be considered exclusive to the Bay Area. I know that for our visit to Austin, there was no shortage of the same things we do here.

    So the bottom line is that the Bay Area and California ( save perhaps the weather) has lost its advantage of being exclusive and dominant in the industries that fueled its spectacular growth. I’m not about to say Cali is through. But I’d expect it to come back down to earth to be more inline with “The rest” of the states. If anything, its now going to have to compete with other states more and more.

    But who knows? Perhaps tomorrow Apple will come out with a thing that cures cancer and everyone here will be rich rich rich beyond their wildest dreams, houses- even crappy ones- will sell for 2 million bucks, the state will continue to be perennially bankrupt yet still somehow function, and people will continue to retain the attitude that they are all very special living here. Time will tell.

  28. Real Estater Says:

    The Bay Area scene is more like the storefronts in NYC. Those who can’t make it will rotate out, while more contenders are coming in constantly. This is exactly what makes the place forever attractive, and keeps it innovating.

  29. anon Says:

    Yep – the place keeps innovating. Even with dead weight like real estater around.

  30. anon Says:

    “RE,
    I’ve already explained my position on my choice. My choice has nothing to do with the opportunities here or elsewhere.”

    Oh, bob – what are we going to do with you?

  31. steve Says:

    bob, in 1992 the bay area went through a major recession fueled by the collapse of the aeroapace industry. cisco was just getting started and google wasn’t a word yet. times and companies change, but what is constant is that the bay area’s schools, weather and opportunities continue to attract the best and the brightest. I’m not betting on the next miracle, but my VC friends are, to the tune of hundreds of billions. what do you think the split of bay area money is compared to say, texas? when dell collapses, how are those round rock property values going to hold up? texas is awesome for things like data centers and bbq, but for real innovation it is second tier.

  32. nomadic Says:

    My choice has nothing to do with the opportunities here or elsewhere.

    Looks like anon kind of beat me to this.

    Come now bob, you’re being disingenuous. Your opportunity in Texas dried up just as a new one became available here. If the outcomes were reversed, you’d have finished packing by now.

  33. Worst Realtard Ad Ever? [Burbed.com] Says:

    […] is in a completely different class of self-promotion than, say, writing cute little jingles about yourself.  Then again, as long as the jingles aren’t NSFW, the jinglemeister won’t […]


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