March 3, 2010

Come see this San Carlos house in the dark

Beds: 3
Baths: 2
Sq. Ft.: 1,370
$/Sq. Ft.: $693
Lot Size: -
Property Type: Detached, Single-Family Home
Style: Ranch
View: City Lights
Year Built: 1926
Community: San Carlos
County: San Mateo
MLS#: 364716
Source: San Francisco MLS
Status: Active This listing is for sale and the sellers are accepting offers.
On Redfin: 40 days
Come see this nice house in a nice area of San Carlos, with a big lot this property is full of potential

This is a very mysterious house, to say the least. Big lot – but no details. Nice house – but no interior pics.

Heck! The exterior pic is too dark to see! Fortunately, the realtor included another one:

image

Better?

Frankly, I don’t think this realtor tried very hard. Just look at the location:

image

What? No traditional comment on “walk to downtown” or “walk to caltrain”? No “easy access to shopping”?

I’m going to hazard a guess that perhaps this realtor doesn’t deserve to make up to $56,940 when this house sells.

But then again, who am I to say? How should the realtor be comped on this one?

Comments (78) -- Posted by: burbed @ 5:15 am

78 Responses to “Come see this San Carlos house in the dark”

  1. nomadic Says:

    Purchased at the peak of the bubble for $863k. The “zestimate” is a helluva lot closer to a realistic price with $808k.

    I think the realtor knows there is a snowball’s chance in hell this place is going to sell and didn’t want to bother with photos. Why put money into a listing you will never get to collect a commission on?

  2. ES Says:

    I was angry until I read Nomadic’s post. This is the realtor’s way of telling the clients that they’re smoking PCP laced with cocaine if they think this place is selling for just shy of $1M.

    Now, having said that, it will go pending w/o release this week.

  3. sonarrat Says:

    I agree completely with nomadic’s assessment. Even in this part of the peninsula, you don’t pay almost a million dollars for “potential.” You pay that money for a finished product.

  4. Real Estater Says:

    Good News! Service Sector grows at fastest pace since 2007.

    As I stated, the job market has picked up significant pace in recent weeks. This is real time info.

  5. Pralay Says:

    As I stated, the job market has picked up significant pace in recent weeks.
    —–

    If this is the best “Good News” our Faux Estater can come up with, then you are really in trouble. Reading Faux Estater’s post #4, you would think companies are hiring like a crazy, especially after his use of word “significantly”. Unfortunately, not so.

    Let’s read the same news here. This one has little bit more details.

    A showing above 50 typically denotes expansion and growth in the industry, while a result below that mark suggests contraction. The index is created using data from purchasing and supply executives around the country.


    Though continuing to show contraction, a specific reading on service-sector employment also showed gains, registering 48.6% last month after hitting 44.6% in January.

    Sevice sector employment is still CONTRACTING. Service sector companies are shedding less jobs than previous months (but still shedding). ISM index improved from 44.6% to 48.6%. That’s all – still below 50%. There is no “job market has picked up significant pace” here.

  6. mtv-renter Says:

    Service sector jobs aren’t the ones propping up million dollar entry level house prices.

  7. Joe Says:

    The company I work for, Boston Scientific, is laying off 1,000 to 1,300 indirect labor positions, which represents more than 10% of the workforce. Real time info.

  8. sv_newbie Says:

    To be fair, most economists believe we are out of recession. Note that equity market is a leading indicator and job market a lagging.

    Look at unemployment rate over 50 years. Every time in recession, when rate of increase of unemployment (double-derivative) decreased, that was the end of the recession.

    I believe overall economy would not become as good as it was (or seemed) in 2007, but things will improve henceforth. Future generations (including me) will pay in taxes for the mistakes made during 2000-2007.

    I also guess this month will be the low of the year in stock market based on last year! In spite of 50% up, stock market has long way to go. There is just huge amount of money in bonds and savings account that is slowly pouring into stocks.

  9. Joe Says:

    Govts around the world are subsidizing the private markets. When that game is done, watch out for the real crash. Definitely wouldn’t be near equities now or then. None of the fundamental problems have been fixed that caused the financial crisis, only new problems have been created for the public sector.

  10. Tuno Says:

    #8: I believe overall economy would not become as good as it was (or seemed) in 2007, but things will improve henceforth.

    I believe that the overall economy is going to keep on sinking for the next seven years, and our government and the MSM are going to keep pretending otherwise until a Republican is elected. then the MSM will actually point out that loads of people are suffering. however, the feds will continue saying all is improving since both parties are utterly full of it. Japan hasn’t exited its poop-hole in twenty years; I give us (with a growing population) a chance of escape after ten, and right now we’re about three years in.

    re the house – wasn’t there, years ago, a daytime show with the name: Daarrrrkk . . . Shadowssss . . .

  11. mtv-renter Says:

    To be fair, most economists believe we are out of recession. Note that equity market is a leading indicator and job market a lagging.

    The economists who are popular on TV and in newspapers (Stiglitz, Krugman, Mankiw, etc) are just attention whores who say politically convenient things which keep them in favor with politicians. They’re lying whores.

    The fact of the matter is that private sector employment is falling, while public sector employment is rising. The public sector doesn’t create wealth, it redistributes wealth, and it funds its operations by taxing the private sector. You have a decreasing number of private people supporting an increasing number of public sector workers, and the increasing burden on the private sector is further accelerating job losses because businesses can’t afford to hire people and pay higher taxes, especially while the economy contracts. This isn’t sustainable.

    Don’t take my word for it. It’s a large endeavor, but I would highly recommend reading some sound economics for yourself and making up your own mind. Tom Woods’ “Meltdown” is a good take on the economic crisis. It’s also worth spending a couple of hours reading the entirety of this site: http://www.conciseguidetoeconomics.com. There are three main schools of economics in the US (well, four if you count Marxists). The Keynesians are very popular with politicians because they advocate taxation and stimulus. The Chicago school advocates monetary manipulation, but is against stimulus and taxing. The Austrian school is very different from both in that it doesn’t make the micro/macro distinction, but to me at least, their analysis of bubbles and the business cycle is the only one which makes sense. The book and site I mentioned present the Austrian perspective.

  12. Pralay Says:

    Do you guys remember boom-boomers? Once they retire there will be tremendous shortage of workers in America. Net result – salary going up and more immigrants will be coming here. Either way it will be great time for bay area. Salary going up translates to housing price going up. More immigrants coming here translates to housing price going up. At least that’s what our greatest bull said in 2008. He put a timeframe too – about 3-5 years. That means it starts from 2011. Next year! Wow, we can’t wait for that time when unemployment rate will drop to 2% and salary will double.

    Oooooppps! That prediction got revised. Now the labor shortage scenario is postponed to 2015. On the top of that, the baby-boomers can’t retire. How much will they save between 2010 and 2015?

  13. anon Says:

    Haha. After having been shown to be wrong time and time again, one wonders: when 2011 comes will real estater slink off in to the shadows where he belongs?

    Nah. He will insist that NOW is the time to buy and that NOW we are cleared for takeoff. Always forward looking.

  14. mike Says:

    i would give my left nut to meet real estater.

    i’m about 80% sure he’s intentionally trolling.

  15. anon Says:

    80? I’m 100%. Nobody could possibly be that stupid.

  16. nomadic Says:

    Nobody could possibly be that stupid.

    Ha, like no one would be stupid enough to loan $750k to a strawberry picker earning $17k/year? Or loan $1.6M+ on a house near me (which I affectionately dubbed the “urine house” because of its smell) on a main road that ultimately was foreclosed and subsequently sold for $625k?

    There’s plenty of stupid people in the world.

  17. bob Says:

    I agree with Joe. The government is trying its best to out a bandaid on the economy. The only problem is that our economy was for the better part of 30 years based on mortgage sales. I’m reading a kind of interesting book which talks about Wall Street from the late 70′s-2007. Most firms like Lehman Brothers and so on made money by selling financial advice prior to the early to mid eighties when selling packaged loans became highly profitable mainly due to a boom in home buying from (you guessed it) boomers. By 2007 almost all of their business came from selling these securities instead.

    So the bottom line is that the bulk of the success in our economy was created by a legacy of debt shuffling. That model is now dead an buried until some other weasely way is found to extract wealth out of our pockets.

    As far as service jobs picking up, well that includes burger flippers and cashiers too so I’m not sure that really means anything. In regards to SV where I work, I know TONS of people who work in various tech companies who have either been laid off or are about to.

    It will be years before any sort of healthy economy will return and when it does, it could very well be a much less flamboyant one at that,

  18. Alex Says:

    80? I’m 100%. Nobody could possibly be that stupid.

    I advise you guys to keep your left nuts. In my profession, I’ve met many idiots. And yes, Faux Estater may truly be that stupid.

  19. nomadic Says:

    bob, are you going to be avoiding equities until a potential future crash? Buying precious metals?

  20. Real Estater Says:

    Those of you who are attacking me:

    - Are you able to buy a house?

    If you’re just a renter, I really wonder, where does the bravado come from?

  21. Real Estater Says:

    Whatever Bob does, do the exact opposite. You just might achieve the opposite outcome, which is exactly what you want.

  22. nomadic Says:

    What about the homeowners on here who “attack” you?

  23. Real Estater Says:

    anon,

    How do you like the new Cayenne?

  24. Real Estater Says:

    nomadic,

    I’m not sure what your disagreement is exactly. If you think it’s dumb to own a home, then it’s something you need to work out with yourself before bothering me.

  25. Herve Estater Says:

    > How do you like the new Cayenne?

    There is even a Cayenne S Hybrid now. Now one can look like an eco-conscious jerk!

    I saw a Panamera the other day. Ugliest Porsche ever. The Boxster must be happy to lose the title.

  26. Real Estater Says:

    >>There is even a Cayenne S Hybrid now.

    It won’t be available in the U.S.

    Hybrids are pointless anyways. Lots of complexity to achieve nothing. Look at what a mess Toyota got itself into.

  27. nomadic Says:

    If you think it’s dumb to own a home…

    Never said that. But most of what you write is dumb, not thought out, contradictory, or just plain illogical. No “home ownership bravado” is required.

  28. Real Estater Says:

    nomadic,

    Just look at the result. My home has over $1M in equity, based on a very conservative appraisal recently done by the bank for my refinance.

    Can you say the same for yourself?

  29. Real Estater Says:

    nomadic,

    From what we heard, you’re the piggy tail guy who came to my neighborhood looking at houses you can only dream about.

  30. nomadic Says:

    Yep, that’s me. Hippie in Birkenstocks with a ponytail who actually is a Shallow Alto wannabe living up in the Santa Cruz Mountains with my pot plants for company.

    You do have entertainment value.

  31. Herve Estater Says:

    7 posts since 9pm and nobody is really attacking Real Estater… Our favorite troll is crying for attention :-)

  32. DreamT Says:

    I think RE just came all over the place.

  33. DreamT Says:

    just in case the above was too obscure :) RE gets off putting down people and does not hesitate to distort or invent to achieve that goal… #29 is the apex of today’s effort, the release, the nirvana.

  34. Alex Says:

    Faux Estater, I’ll continue renting. With all the money I save, I’ll use on hookers and beer. Then I’ll freaking piss in yer yard after I’m full of beer.

    After all that, I’ll still come out ahead.

  35. Herve Estater Says:

    I think he was already quite turned on with the pictures from post #23. Made it easy to reach climax after that.

  36. anon Says:

    *yawn*

  37. sv_newbie Says:

    #11, mtv-renter, thanks for the link. great site.
    i am also a firm believer in the Austrian school of eco.

    i agree with whatever you said, but at some point economy will start improving – it’s just a matter of when. i guess that time has already come. as i said look at unemployment chart (calculatedrisk has many). when double-derivative went positive that marked end of recession in past.

    to share my story with house hunt. i have been looking for a decent house in decent place for the list. so, the market is really hot in this segment right now. probably too hot. i’ll not be surprised (and wish) to see a mini-bubble burst in near months.

    but, govt will keep transferring money from future to present until economy is back on track. Keynesian doesnt work in long term, but it gives the desired result in short term.

  38. sv_newbie Says:

    burbed chewed some of my words, correcting below-

    >>i have been looking for a decent house in a decent place for less than 800k. i put offer on 4 houses, was outbid on all. 3 of them sold over the list. my offers were also more than what i thought was the true worth of the houses.

  39. Pralay Says:

    If you’re just a renter, I really wonder, where does the bravado come from?
    —-

    We get it, Faux Estater. Homeownership has many privileges, including joy of lying though the teeth – as you did in #4.

  40. Real Estater Says:

    sv_newbie has been out there experiencing the real world, and his findings align with everything I’ve been saying (and attacked for). Anybody else who has been shopping pretty much report the same things(and as uaual attacked or made fun of).

  41. anon Says:

    And that is precisely the reason now is a really bad time to buy.

  42. Real Estater Says:

    Pralay,

    Did you read #8? In other words, you think I’m lying because you are reading a lagging indicator while I’m providing real time information.

  43. Real Estater Says:

    >>And that is precisely the reason now is a really bad time to buy.

    And everybody is buying because it’s a bad time to buy? Makes sense to a rentard, I suppose.

  44. Pralay Says:

    Did you read #8?
    —-

    Yes, I did and it was not posted by you. I was talking about #4 where the statement “job market has picked up significant pace in recent weeks” is completely lie.

  45. anon Says:

    “A simple rule dictates my buying: Be fearful when others are greedy, and be greedy when others are fearful,” said Buffett.

  46. Real Estater Says:

    anon,

    When you don’t know what you’re doing to save your life, Buffet is not going to be of much help.

  47. Pralay Says:

    and his findings align with everything I’ve been saying
    —-

    No, sv_newbie is giving his opinion. And you are lying by giving link to news about ISM report. That’s the basic difference.

  48. Pralay Says:

    When you don’t know what you’re doing to save your life, Buffet is not going to be of much help.
    —-

    Faux Estater is the only person who helps.

    Poor Faux Estater. Still others attack him.

  49. Pralay Says:

    nomadic,

    Just look at the result.
    —–

    LOL! Result? How much respect did you achieve here? Still people are attacking you and calling you troll? How much respect are you getting in your workplace? Is your zipcode helping to cover-up your stupidity?

  50. Pralay Says:

    Anybody else who has been shopping pretty much report the same things(and as uaual attacked or made fun of).
    —–

    You mean SV “wife-big-on-education” Shopper who has a “professional realtor” and spells “humour” exactly like you? Does he spell “balony” too?

  51. DreamT Says:

    IMO inventory is artificially low at the moment because the incentive to hold on to your house is greater in California & Bay Area than elsewhere (prop 13, 1% property tax and perception of low demand feeding unto self). And we’ve reached a plateau: government’s helping delay the inevitable, banks have learned to control the flow of foreclosure, folks survive with a pay cut or two. The only thing driving prices up (yes they’re going up) is that choked inventory curve, but there’s nothing sustainable about it. A country defaults and the economy tanks, dragging down house prices. Property tax rate is increased, drags prices down. Shadow bank inventory finally out of control, same. Rampant inflation? Benefits current homeowners but does not help future buyers as their downpayment savings become worthless, i.e. drags prices down again. Credit? Can’t go any lower than the 4.5% / 5% we’re at today, so will drag prices down again. Schools? They’re getting worse every year and ever a greater financial drain on the locals. Even a surge in local jobs and change in migration policy would have to beat all of the above to substantially lift house prices in the foreseeable future.

  52. DreamT Says:

    correction: perception of low inventory feeds unto self. If I sell, it’ll be too hard to buy again so why bother.

  53. Pralay Says:

    I think he was already quite turned on with the pictures from post #23.

    You mean like this guy? Is that what he was referring as Trophy Wife all along?

  54. Tuno Says:

    #51 – all sounds right except for the rampant inflation, which we’ll only have in things like food and fuel, which can’t be lived without. since wages won’t go up to cover the rise in prices (think of the 4 billion GATT humans we’re competing against now) house prices will need to come down.

  55. bob Says:

    Nomadic,
    I am pretty well-rounded in terms of investing. I’ve always mentioned everyone needs to have exposure to an assortment of investments.

    RE,
    Yes- I could buy a house here in the Bay Area if I wanted to but since I feel homes are overvalued and the quality of life in the area is no longer satisfactory I don’t care to.

    In regards to your comment about hybrids, they aren’t these mystical, crazy complicated machines you and others make them out to be. A prius is basically a drivetrain that includes an electric motor which sits inside the transaxle. It piggiebacks off of the engine. Most people point to the battery as a concern. Batteries are like anything else and can be handled and managed to perform for long periods of time. The batteries on most hybdrids only charge and discharge 40-60%. That puts less stress on the cells. At the current rate less than 2% of all Prius batteries have failed. Putting that into perspective the failure rate amongst many car engines- especially in higher compression, over-engineered engines you tend to find in POS European cars- is much greater than the failure rate of the prius battery. The Prius problem has been way overblown with a few hundred complaints for a car that sells in the hundreds of thousands.

  56. Herve Estater Says:

    > In regards to your comment about hybrids [...]

    Can’t you tell when Real Estater is trolling?

  57. nomadic Says:

    I’ve always mentioned everyone needs to have exposure to an assortment of investments.

    Very true. I was just curious whether you’re putting new money into equities.

  58. Sio2 Says:

    Bob, you wrote
    ” especially in higher compression, over-engineered engines you tend to find in POS European cars-”

    actually, the engines rarely fail prematurely in EU cars. (meaning, pre 200k miles or so). It tends to be other things causing trouble, like window regulators (VW), auto transmissions (BMW), software problems (Mercedes) and stuff like that. Of course, Toyota is no stranger to engine failures with the recent sludge problems they have had.

    I will agree that for appliance point a to point b, a Prius is hard to beat. (except perhaps the dangerously long stopping distances from the low friction tires.) But I also like to have some fun while driving, so I find EU cars to be worth some hassles. To each their own.

  59. Real Estater Says:

    Bob,

    Hybrids are bad for the environment. One day, all of these batteries need to end up somewhere.

    Hybrids are bad for your pocketbook. You pay a higher price for a Hybrid than an equivalent economy car. By the time you get your money back through fuel savings, it’s time for a new car.

    Hybrids require special expertise to maintain. You can’t take it to a street corner garage and expect they know how to work on it. Even Toyota themselves cannot deal with the problems.

    Finally, Hybrids are throw-away cars. When the car reaches old age, it would be economically unfeasible to rebuild such cars. For this reason as well, Hybrids are bad for the environment. Compare that to an old VW or Porsche 911, which run forever. Those are the truly “Green” cars.

    To summarize: Hybrids are pointless, and I am neither trolling nor kidding.

  60. Real Estater Says:

    DreamT says,
    >>correction: perception of low inventory feeds unto self. If I sell, it’ll be too hard to buy again so why bother.

    Except there is one guy here who will attack anyone with that perception; essentially, he’s attacking the market.

  61. Pralay Says:

    It’s Friday! Where is the “Good News” before we start another wet weekend? I thought unemployment was on the way down six months back.

    Yes, I heard Walmart is hiring.

  62. anon Says:

    Wow. Post 59 reads like it was written by a second grader.

    I’m picturing a little kid giving a presentation entitled: Why hybrids are bad.

  63. Real Estater Says:

    Pralay,

    Read the news for yourself. Hint: The market is up today because of it.

  64. Real Estater Says:

    anon,

    How’s the Cayenne?

  65. Pralay Says:

    Read the news for yourself. Hint: The market is up today because of it.
    —–

    Why reading myself when Faux Estater serves “Good News”?

  66. nomadic Says:

    Yeah, Pralay, a market desperate for good news reacted positively to this:

    Summary Box: Unemployment rate remains at 9.7 pct.

    (AP) – 30 minutes ago

    WORST OVER?: The jobless rate held at 9.7 percent in February, and the economy lost a net 36,000 jobs, a better-than-expected showing. Some economists had predicted deeper job cuts due to severe snowstorms.

    BETTER DAYS AHEAD: The report pointed to slow improvements. Some think the economy could start adding jobs steadily, starting with the report for March. But job creation isn’t expected to be robust enough to quickly drive down the unemployment rate.

    SLOW DIG: Economists think it could take until the middle of the decade for the rate to drop back to a normal 5.5 percent to 6 percent.

    I wonder if RE always has problems with premature exclamation? ;-)

  67. Pralay Says:

    I wonder if RE always has problems with premature exclamation?
    —–

    There is a reason there is no “Good News” today.

  68. Pralay Says:

    Some think the economy could start adding jobs steadily, starting with the report for March.
    —-

    Didn’t those “some” people notice that Walmart is hiring in Mulberry? There are Absolutely areas with feeding frenzy (with a capital A).

  69. anon Says:

    I love it.

    “Some Think.”

    Meaning:
    “I think.” Commonly used as a way to advance an opinion or agenda without while trying to appear as though one has a neutral point of view. May come as a deferment to an authority, or an appeal to group think.

    Also see: I think, some experts believe, industry insiders say, others argue, some would say, some might say, many people feel, proponents believe, opponents believe, research suggests, it turns out that, many people argue, and nearly everything else real estater says.

  70. Pralay Says:

    I love it.

    “Some Think.”
    —–

    That’s right. That technique was mastered by Fox News.

    Fox Estater has a similar one – “credible source”. :)

  71. bob Says:

    RE,
    Once again you show your ignorance when it comes to cars. Let me fill you in.
    First of all, Toyota has a $600 buyback program on their batteries. They’re made out of nickel compounds which are pretty expensive thus they are recycled. Looking at it from the perspective of ‘normal’ cars, they all use lead acid batteries and 85% of those get recycled. So how is a nickel metal hydride battery any different? It too gets recycled. Les than 2% of all prius batteries have failed to date anyhow. We own one of the earliest models and over 8 years later its still going strong.

    They don’t cost anymore than a regular family sedan. Go and look. Just about any boring ole’ famlily car costs cost to $30,000 these days… right inline with the prius, which costs $24,000- $29,000.

    Sio2, European cars are basically like most anything we buy from Europe: People think that just because they’re “Euro-pean” that they MUST be special. Like Saab- an utterly crappy, ridiculous looking car that automatically becomes some coveted car for college professors.

    All I know is that the Japanese have now easily got BMW and Mercedes soundly whipped in the luxury car market these days.

  72. Real Estater Says:

    Bob,

    How many batteries are in a Prius vs. a normal car?

    As for “European” cars, I agree that’s a useless aggregate label. In Europe most people drive small crappy cars with no more character than Toyotas and Hondas.

  73. nomadic Says:

    Like Saab- an utterly crappy, ridiculous looking car that automatically becomes some coveted car for college professors.

    Now it’s war, bob.

  74. Sio2 Says:

    Bob and RE – yin and yang

    RE – It’s hardly true that 911s run forever. They are fantastic cars. But they wear out, just like anything else. A 911 that is garaged, driven only on weekends, and otherwise pampered will last longer than a commuter car. But a pampered Honda would last a long time too.
    As Bob pointed out, the batteries are recycled. And in the field, few hybrids have had to have the batteries replaced.

    But, Bob..
    “All I know is that the Japanese have now easily got BMW and Mercedes soundly whipped in the luxury car market these days.” For appliance cars, absolutely. Or for luxury in the sense of very quiet and lots of gadgets, a Lexus LS is hard to beat. But for those who enjoy the drive, BMW, Mercedes, Audi are still better than Lexus, Infiniti, Acura. And not necessarily unreliable either – my wife’s BMW has had fewer problems than my Mazda, even though it has more miles.

  75. bob Says:

    I’m not a fan of most European cars because I’ve known hardly anyone that has owned one that didn’t wind up having to spend tons of money getting the things fixed. I had one housemate who sunk 1000′s into a 2000 Mercedes C class. The sun roof went out on it and the only way it was repairable was to replace the whole unit. $3,500 later it was fixed… only for the head gasket to blow shortly after- a $5,000 repair.

    I do all the work on our cars and also my friend’s cars as well. There’s a difference between typical Japanese and European engineering. For example my Wife’s mother has a VW Jetta. It drives and handles great. The fit and finish “looks” great. But that’s what is so deceiving about them. There is a lot of focus on the fit and finish on most European cars. But the engineering in many cases is poorly executed. This particular VW has a pressurized coolant system. The overflow tank has a temperature switch installed in the side. A rubber O-ring seals it in. Guess what? The rubber O-ring wears out in 2-3 years, which makes the coolant leak. They could’ve placed the sensor in the radiator like most carmakers do, but nope- they instead chose a method that’s ridiculously complicated and prone to failure. That’s just one example but it seems that when I open the hood on a typical European car, it looks nice, is seemingly well put together, but when you look at the way its actually built its like- what the hell? Why do it that way when that’s such a dumb, problem-prone way of doing it?

    On most any Japanese car I’ve worked on ( except Mitsubishi which builds junk) There’s been a clear effort to maximize simplicity. Where a BMW might have 6 screws holding a intake manifold to the firewall a Toyota will have 3. But if you look at the hardware on a Toyota, they use high quality stuff. Yellow anodized and stainless are used a lot. I’ve removed parts on my 14 year old Toyota truck that have never been touched yet they come off easily because higher corrosion resistant hardware was used.

    Lastly, there is usually a high degree of consideration for the person servicing the car on a typical Honda or Toyota. Wrenches and screwdrivers fit into most places. Most parts can be removed and replaced while standing over the car. Things like drain plugs are easy to reach. Most European cars I’ve worked on are nightmares with crap loads of decorative plastic sheeting to remove first followed by components impossible to get at without a lift.

  76. nomadic Says:

    Lastly, there is usually a high degree of consideration for the person servicing the car on a typical Honda or Toyota. Wrenches and screwdrivers fit into most places. Most parts can be removed and replaced while standing over the car. Things like drain plugs are easy to reach.

    Before Toyota launches a new model they do a test build on the production line in Japan. If any of the assembly people raise an issue or complain about how any of the parts go together, it has to be fixed before they’ll launch. Sometimes they can be a real PITA to satisfy.

  77. Herve Estater Says:

    > Most European cars I’ve worked on are nightmares [...]

    Did it ever occur to you that maybe, MAYBE, they were more adapted to the European morphology?

  78. Real Estater Says:

    NEW YORK (AP) — Porsche shot to the top of a closely watched study of long-term vehicle dependability, overtaking U.S. and Japanese rivals, J.D. Power and Associates said Thursday.


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