February 18, 2011

Campbell house with exclusive mall privs

$699,950

Beds: 3
Baths: 1.5
Sq. Ft.: 1,220
$/Sq. Ft.: $574
Lot Size: 9,842 Sq. Ft.
Property Type: Detached Single Family
Style: Ranch
Stories: 1
View: Neighborhood
Year Built: 1950
Community: Campbell
County: Santa Clara
MLS#: 81102039
Source: MLSListings
Status: ActiveThis listing is for sale and the sellers are accepting offers.
On Redfin: 15 days
Beautifully updated home in very desirable neighborhood. Many upgrades throughout. Forced air heating, central air conditioning, recently installed tile floors, windows, kitchen, baths, roof, electrical (200 amp service), you name it, it’s been done. Excellent location provides easy access to wonderful shopping, transportation, schools and leisure. In ground pool recently re-done and is beautiful.

More than anything else, I’m impressed with the photos that are attached to this listing. Let’s take a look!

The lead off photo:

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Proof that this house exists near an intersection. Hey, that’s convenience. I just hate it when you buy
a house and it turns out it’s not near an intersection of any sort.

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Look! A street! And it’s paved! That’s the sign of excellence! (although it’s a little strange how the right side of the street in this photo seems to be wet the entire distance. Huh?

1301142613011426[4]

Look! Buying this house even gives you rights to go to the prestigious and exclusive El Paseo de Saratoga and Westgate clubs!

Wow. Wow. Wow!

This house is definitely packed with value – and 200 amp service.

Comments (21) -- Posted by: burbed @ 5:23 am

21 Responses to “Campbell house with exclusive mall privs”

  1. sfbubblebuyer Says:

    There isn’t a single interior shot! Nor one of the pool. Not even one where the realtor was in the front yard. It’s like he’s trying to sell a house for a north carolina hillbilly.
    “Y’all best not set foot on mah propertah!”
    “But you hired me to see your house!”
    “Yep, but y’all can do it from the street.”
    *spits out some tebaccy juice*

  2. SEA Says:

    “…in very desirable neighborhood”

    Sure the asking price might be $700k ($574 psf), but this IS a desirable neighborhood. My guess is that this particular home would be much more desirable at half-price. Of course then I’m sure the neighborhood wouldn’t be desirable.

  3. nomadic Says:

    It has a nice-sized lot. And the OCD shrubs in the street view appear to be trimmed into submission. The list of similar sales indicates that the price is probably realistic – at least if the condition is as good as the realtard claims. Too bad there aren’t any photos to back it up.

    Love the scenario in #1. :-)

  4. Marty Says:

    Who cares what the house looks like inside. With all that great shopping you’d never be home for long.

    I’d grab a bagel at Noah’s and sit in front of the European Wax Center. I could kill hours doing that.

  5. madhaus Says:

    With some properties, the value is in the land. In this case, the value is in the mall. Buy now and spave!

    Our resident Negative Nathan has been busy! All the front page posts have been given a few love taps again, as have this morning’s comments, twice already. Be sure to show some love for the site founder, who has brought you five years of Burbed!

  6. nomadic Says:

    The poor sap. No one will talk to him on the other thread, so he’s just sulking around negging the posts quietly. Hmm, maybe that’s not so bad. And we’re still talking about him, which he loves. Win-win.

  7. SEA Says:

    He’s a busy guy, collecting all those rent checks and all.

  8. anon Says:

    Hm. I don’t think the realtor did a good enough job talking up this shitbox. Perhaps more usage of the word beautiful. Might I suggest:

    “Beautifully updated home in very desirable and beautiful neighborhood. many beautiful upgrades throughout. beautiful forced air heating, beautiful central air conditioning, recently beautifully installed tile floors, windows, kitchen, baths, roof, electrical, you name it, IT IS [sic] been done. Beautiful excellent beautiful location provides easy access to wonderful and beautiful shopping, transportation, schools, and leisure. Beautiful in ground pool recently beautifully re-done and is beautiful.”

    Beautiful. That’s the first thing I thought when I looked at this listing. I can’t be alone. Remember, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Or is it the bagholder? I forget which. Things are just so confusing nowadays. How did the old saying go? All the free money washing about this past decade has caused me to forget those little bits of wisdom that previous generetions had figured out for us.

    Anyway, what a fine abode. It is just perfect for the typical impoverished silicon valley executive family making only $233,333 a year. If only I could expect to reliably make that kind of money for the next 30 years. The first thing I’d do is snap this house up. Then I’d be swimming in the beautiful and mysterious redone swimming pool. And you all would be jealous. Yeah, that’s right. Admit it. You’d be jealous. In fact, you are jealous. I can see it in your eyes. Don’t deny it, that just makes it worse. You’d hate me because I’d be better than you because I’d own this house.

  9. AstroWallaby Says:

    Odd how they failed to mention is the house is a great walkable location for all your vigilante-style revenge killing needs. (Perhaps the photo of the El Paseo de Saratoga shopping center sign is enough.)

    http://www.mercurynews.com/crime-courts/ci_17113404

  10. madhaus Says:

    #8, awesome comment.

    I have to issue a correction on what I said in #5, above. It is not limited to just the front page, our little Tommy Tantrum has voted down every single post on the first five pages of the site. I bet he feels so incredibly powerful, and undefeatable, and, well, kind of like #8 above: You hate me because I am better than you because I own a house in P*** A***.

  11. SEA Says:

    In Re Income and Expense Matching versus Cash Flow:

    “Anyway, what a fine abode. It is just perfect for the typical impoverished silicon valley executive family making only $233,333 a year. If only I could expect to reliably make that kind of money for the next 30 years.”

    Yes! In the past the basic attitude was that if your employer, source of income, went bankrupt, you’d immediately obtain a new source. Basically who cares if my current $250k income dried up, since another source of income would quickly show up, and that new source would likely be bigger, better.

    Note the parallels to the attitudes of sellers then versus now. Back in the “good ‘ole days” sellers had the attitude that if a buyer didn’t buy, for whatever reason, then another buyer would magically show up begging to pay more (the so-called over-bidding syndrome).

    When you expect your income to only go up in the future, as well as property values, it’s very easy to positively mortgage your future away. Even if the $250k in annual income couldn’t immediately be replaced, it didn’t matter, since one could always sell quick and easy for a big profit.

    What happens, however, when you expect property values to go down in the future? Or if you expect your future income is at risk? Or if you expect that you might have to move far away for a bigger and better opportunity, but properties are taking a long time to sell?

    Remember when I posted about the cash flow positive teenager who delivered my pizza. It was clear to me that while he might have been cash flow positive today, there was almost surely to be some future problems. Basically he’ll be left with a vehicle that has little to no value, but the loan balance will be ginormous, relatively speaking. Driving that new vehicle, he’s probably a big shot among his friends–just like your friends would be jealous if you bought today’s featured house.

    Why is it that when someone pays cash the price and value is very critical, but when someone buys on credit, all that matters is how low the payments are? I know this generalization does not apply to all buyers, but there are plenty of buyers who are only concerned about how low the payments are without respect to the underlying value of the product.

    You know the routine, I’m sure you’ve heard it, “My low monthly mortgage payments are less than renting…”

  12. The Gilroy Alex Says:

    The “wet” side of the road is new asphalt, I’m fairly sure.

    It can’t be an elite RBA neighborhood without a few murder-suicides in its history so that’s a plus.

    As for the RealtWhore not being able to take pics inside, in my own neighborhood, 15 women were held prisoner in a building right downtown, for months, as sex slaves. I’m sure this place as a similar profit-center going on, whether it’s drugs, snuff films, child prostitution, why, the sky’s the limit so BUY NOW!

  13. anon Says:

    That Gilroy place sure sounds special. How long until property values keep going up again?

    “Yes! In the past the basic attitude was that if your employer, source of income, went bankrupt, you’d immediately obtain a new source. Basically who cares if my current $250k income dried up, since another source of income would quickly show up, and that new source would likely be bigger, better.”

    That was the case and the belief continues. It is what keeps people like RE buying.

    “Note the parallels to the attitudes of sellers then versus now. Back in the “good ‘ole days” sellers had the attitude that if a buyer didn’t buy, for whatever reason, then another buyer would magically show up begging to pay more (the so-called over-bidding syndrome).”

    Those were the good ol days weren’t they – when the great unwashed masses were given unlimited borrowed dollars with which to speculate on housing. Like Willow Glenner said, all owners had to do was wait and “they’ll get their price.” One just had to be patient. And pay the carrying costs. Heh.

    When you expect your income to only go up in the future, as well as property values, it’s very easy to positively mortgage your future away. Even if the $250k in annual income couldn’t immediately be replaced, it didn’t matter, since one could always sell quick and easy for a big profit.

    You’re right, it is very easy. This is the trap the banks have set up to enslave the populace. You think the banks in it to make money? Yeah right. The government prints it. The banks make it regardless. The banks real utility is in creating an indentured and servile (and therefore inexpensive) workforce.

    “What happens, however, when you expect property values to go down in the future? Or if you expect your future income is at risk? Or if you expect that you might have to move far away for a bigger and better opportunity, but properties are taking a long time to sell?”

    You find yourself in a real bind and you wait and hope for a bailout until you have exhausted what you have and realize it’s not coming and then you roll over and declare bankruptcy. The trick for the banks is to cause people to spend their wealth BEFORE they declare bankruptcy. This is why the constant expectation of appreciation is so incredibly important to the government’s/bank’s/NAR’s plan. It won’t be coming. The banks and the government are losing money propping up the industry. They won’t do this forever. This is why you are seeing all the talk of dismantling Fannie and Freddy.

    Remember when I posted about the cash flow positive teenager who delivered my pizza. It was clear to me that while he might have been cash flow positive today, there was almost surely to be some future problems. Basically he’ll be left with a vehicle that has little to no value, but the loan balance will be ginormous, relatively speaking. Driving that new vehicle, he’s probably a big shot among his friends–just like your friends would be jealous if you bought today’s featured house.

    What’s that? The powers that be using a person’s primal instincts to induce them to engage in self destructive behavior? Well, I never! Remember, big house (or small one in palo alto) + nice car = alpha male. You are double alpha grade if you have a name brand diploma. Triple alpha if its all on borrowed money. It’s that simple.

    Why is it that when someone pays cash the price and value is very critical, but when someone buys on credit, all that matters is how low the payments are? I know this generalization does not apply to all buyers, but there are plenty of buyers who are only concerned about how low the payments are without respect to the underlying value of the product.

    It doesn’t matter to the buyers who have little to no financial education. Sadly, this is most of them. Oh well, somebody has to subsidize the renters.

  14. nomadic Says:

    This is the trap the banks have set up to enslave the populace. You think the banks in it to make money? Yeah right. The government prints it. The banks make it regardless. The banks real utility is in creating an indentured and servile (and therefore inexpensive) workforce.

    You’ve been reading too many pamphlets handed out by the homeless.

    Inexpensive workforce? In the USA? Tell that to all the companies off-shoring to India, China, Vietnam, etc.

  15. anon Says:

    Sure, you can go to some asian country and pick up a few drones like real estater on the cheap, but how valuable are they? Is it possible that some workers here, in general, offer something that the ones in India, China and Vietnam don’t? Is it possible that they are, on the average, also harder to control?

    Yes, mechanics, plumbers, assembly line workers, technicians, and many other manual laborers are more expensive here than they are in other countries. But are engineers, MBAs, doctors and lawyers? The same thing doesn’t seem to hold true when you don’t have to be in a specific physical location to perform one’s job.

    Anyway, in order to for the banks and powers that be to successfully do this, salaries must be inflated before they are deflated. And, you can’t just inflate them for a year or two. It has to be long enough to where it is believable and will induce the expectation of ever rising home values and salaries into the common man. This doesn’t happen overnight. A decade and a half might do it, tho…

  16. gallileo Says:

    #13

    Holy Teal Dear!

  17. The Gilroy Alex Says:

    Come on people we’re not being paid by the word.

    Gilroy is so special and full of win that its whole downtown is condemned for earthquake retrofits, which no one has the money to for here, so come on down and buy it’s set to go up Up UP!

  18. Tuno Says:

    wow, so when the Big One hits Gilroy, the streets are going to be clogged with sex slaves who have escaped the mangled houses

  19. The Gilroy Alex Says:

    Tuno, all I can say is ….. you really know my town! :-)

  20. Real Estater Says:

    I see that some people like to blame the world’s evil on me even when I’m not here. WTF? Yes, I must have ticked all those thumbs down. Why don’t you try it? The systems allows only one vote, unless there’s a bug…then it’s your own fault.

  21. Real Estater Says:

    Btw, if thumbs down is unwelecomed here, I have only one suggestion: Allow only thumbs up in this site.


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