November 12, 2011

Edgar Martins, Artist or Real Estate Professional?

A while back, we featured this home with WYSIWYG photography that didn’t pretty up a thing.  Remember this place in East San Jose with the really inspired photography (if by inspired I really meant WTF)?

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This was the home where most of the photos were of the floor and the bottom third of the walls.  At the time I said that the agent was a misunderstood artist, and the opposite of Edgar Martins.  You were probably imagewondering who Edgar Martins was.  Today, you’re going to find out why this Portuguese-born Macau-raised fine-arts photographer is just like a realtard.

Edgar Martins was commissioned in 2008 for a very high-profile New York Times Magazine photo essay on the physical results of the mortgage meltdown.  There was some resentment from American photographers over this gig being given to a European, but Martins certainly had a gift for the compelling image.

Then someone worked out why they were so intriguing.  His photos weren’t what he claimed they were.

imageMartins has always said that he didn’t do any post-production of his work at all, that there was no digital manipulation. Looking at his work now, it’s screamingly obvious everything was mirrored, cloned, and shopped out the yinyang. For years all the fine arts types believed him until Adam Gurno (unixrat) on MetaFilter called shenanigans, and as a result, the New York Times yanked his photo essay.

Martins’ response was of course his stuff is manipulated, you stupid idiots. That was the whole POINT, and none of you saw it because I told you it wasn’t there, you ignorant fools.

To be honest, he said the above more like this:

This work explores the concept of ‘home’ as an idea and a form, and summons a disquieting conjunction of reality, hyper-reality, fantasy and fiction.

And he justifies lying to his fans, his clients, his curators, and his employers with this PoMo putrescence:

“It is my view that there was a clear misunderstanding concerning the values and rights associated to the creative process which made a renown publication like The New York Times Magazine, commission a fine-artist, such as myself, to depict a very specific view of reality without taking all the necessary measures to ensure that I was aware of its journalistic parameters and limits. On the other hand I did not see these as a valid boundary. . . . Whilst I welcome some of the debate that is taking place, I did not envisage that it would be mostly centered on polarities such as ethical/unethical, right/wrong, real/unreal.”

imageYou see, that’s what selling homes is all about. It’s telling people there’s no downside, there’s no time to lose, there’s nothing that can go wrong as long as you BUY NOW. The TIME to BUY is NOW.

And we should have known from the get-go that they’re ALL lying.  And if we didn’t, then being tricked out of hundreds of thousands of dollars is just part of the context of representational imagery and the insubstantiality of happiness from material things.  Let’s not debate pointless polarities such as true/false, positive/negative, gain/loss, permitted/unpermitted, yours/mine, or signed/forged.

imageI do recommend you look at his “This is Not a House” set of photos on his website, and his photography book of the same title has just been released.  Note there is no more bluster about his images being unprocessed or unaltered.  Now “his interest is in summoning a disquieting conjunction of realism and fiction by ‘cutting into the real’.”

imageThe book description for This is Not a House also says it was a commission for the NYT, but neglects to mention his rather public firing for misrepresenting his artistic process.  As fine art critique of bubble building and bust, it is indeed powerful stuff. Most of it also looks shopped. I can tell by the pixels.

And as realtard speak, it’s obvious fiction stubbornly insisting it’s 100% factual.  Home prices never go down!  Yes it’s affordable!  Buy now or be priced out forever!  The rules of the market don’t apply here!  The TIME to BUY is NOW.

Comments (6) -- Posted by: madhaus @ 5:00 am






March 20, 2010

Sell Your Home with Feng Shui: A Complete Guide to Staging Homes for Quick Sale in Any Market (Paperback) ~ Christine Ayres (Author), Cindy Coverdale (Author)

Sell Your Home with Feng Shui: A Complete Guide to Staging Homes for Quick Sale in Any Market (Paperback)

~ Christine Ayres (Author), Cindy Coverdale (Author)

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This is a must have book for all real estate agents or homeowners, wishing to sell a home! Feng Shui experts Christine Ayres and Cindy Coverdale have packed this user friendly guide with easy-to-follow-tips for staging a home to sell quickly in any market. Included in this how to book is a quick reference guide as well as tips to broaden the market, information on how to enhance curb appeal and attract more buyers, as well as full color photos of staging examples and many sales success stories.

Thanks to Burbed reader Herve for this suggestion!

Let’s face it, in some of today’s less competitive markets, where prices increased only 2% from last year, you’ll need all the help you can to sell your house. Adding 888 to your price? That’s beginner’s level. Just like how companies need to be ISO 9001 and Web 2.0 compliant to succeed, your house needs to be feng shui compliant in order to sell well and attract those who have cash money (hint: no one in America).

Or at least you could go fusion – you know, that’s the other hot trend! A St. Joseph’s statue buried in the front yard, with a feng shui’ed house is a sure winner!

How feng shui compliant is your current abode? Don’t you think its time you took it to the next level?

Helped this site become feng shui compliant! Click this link to learn more about donating to this site’s hosting costs!

Comments (5) -- Posted by: burbed @ 5:55 am

March 13, 2010

Real Estate Finance (Appraisers Edition) – Walt Huber & Levin Messick

It’s saturday! That means it’s time for Burbed’s book of the week!

Real Estate Finance (Appraisers Edition) (Paperback)

~ Walt Huber & Levin Messick (Author)

$59.50 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping. Details

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This strikes me as a slightly silly book. Why would an appraiser need a book on real estate finance in California. It’s simple: prices always go up. Just add 5% to 8% at a minimum to last year’s value. Heck, it could be summarized into a formula:

Current House Price = House Price in Year Y x (1.08)^(This year-Y)

Boom! Instant time saver!

Now, sure you could use statistics, modeling, and finance, but for what reason? To use data and all that sort of silliness? Nah, forget about! Prices come from the gut – everyone knows that.

Could someone buy this book and let us know if it covers key topics? Such as when to add “888” to the price? Or to take your gobs of money and re-invest it into other California real estate? Or how we can finally beat Manhattan? Now those would be time savers!

Here’s a another time saver! Click this link to learn more about donating to this site’s hosting costs!

Comments (3) -- Posted by: burbed @ 5:29 am

February 13, 2010

Mission San Jose: California Mission Projects Made Easy

Mission San Jose: California Mission Projects Made Easy [Download: PDF] (Digital)
~ Betsy B. Malloy (Author)

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Product Description
History of Mission San Jose (in Fremont, California), full-color model patterns, mission pictures and maps.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

The native people lived in northern California for thousands of years before the Spanish arrived to build Mission San Jose. They had stone and bone tools. They hunted and gathered food. Some of them moved when the seasons changed. Others lived in one place.

These are things we know about the. About 200 people lived in the area that is now Fremont. They lived in two small groups or tribes. They were called the Alson and Tuibun. They lived mostly in one place. Their villages were near the bay’s edge. They stood on high ground above a salt water marsh. They spoke a version of the Ohlone language called Chochenyo. They also spoke the Miwok language. They called their village Oroysom.

So as we know, there’s sometimes some sarcasm and cynicism on this site. Just a little. But who can resist this kit? With it, anyone can easily build a San Jose Mission. It’s like Maker Faire at the Cow Palace, but at home instead of driving to the impossible to find Cow Palace.

Buy a few packs of these so you can build your own subdivision. Pretend you’re a developer! Think of the possibilities!

When you’re not busy building Burbedville, you can help make sure this site continues to be great! Click this link to learn more about donating to this site’s hosting costs!

Comments (1) -- Posted by: burbed @ 5:47 am

February 6, 2010

San Jose’s Historic Downtown (CA) (Images of America) (Paperback)

San Jose’s Historic Downtown (CA) (Images of America) (Paperback)
Lauren Miranda Gilbert (Author)

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San Jose is the Capital of the Silicon Valley the high-rise, economic engine of advanced technology. Yet it was once a verdant valley, inhabited by wildlife, waterfowl, and the native Ohlone people. The Spanish who founded California’s first civilian settlement here in 1777 named it for Saint Joseph, the patron saint of the Spanish Expedition. Their farms fed the soldiers at the Monterey and San Francisco presidios, beginning an agricultural industry that thrived for nearly 200 years. Although serving briefly as California’s first state capital, for many decades downtown was the somewhat sleepy commercial center of the Santa Clara Valley. A housing and population expansion that began in the 1950s exploded with San Jose’s rebirth as a technological mecca.

Let’s face it – it’s all too often that we overlook the gem that is San Jose’s historic downtown. It’s like any other bustling metropolis, just lacking… uh… the bustle. Heck, it even served as the first state capital!

For those of you who don’t own real estate yet, you should buy this book so you can look back and reflect on how if you had invested in San Jose’s downtown earlier, you’d be… someone who owns real estate in San Jose’s downtown today.

More importantly, what will be the next chapter for San Jose’s downtown? Let’s be frank – overtaking Manhattan is probably a stretch for a long time to come. But… could it at least achieve parity with San Francisco? What could San Jose do to make its downtown better?

When you’re not busy brainstorming a better Downtown San Jose, you can help make sure this site continues to be great! Click this link to learn more about donating to this site’s hosting costs!

Comments (4) -- Posted by: burbed @ 5:40 am

January 30, 2010

Over Time: Palo Alto, 1947-1980

Over Time: Palo Alto, 1947-1980 (General History: California) (Paperback)
~ Ben Hatfield
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Adrian Hatfield was one of many happy veterans returning to Palo Alto after World War II, but this flying ace and Stanford student (class of 1938) would spend the next 33 years photographing every inch of Palo Alto and vicinity. Presented here for the first time in published form is the aerial photography of Adrian Hatfield, founder of Hatfield Aerial Survey in 1947. The astounding visual archives that he created during his long career documents the evolution of a small town surrounded by dairies, farms, and apricot orchards to a tech-industry giant that finds its roots firmly attached to Stanford University. Working closely with developers such as Joseph Eichler, Hatfield witnessed, recorded, and helped build the community that is Palo Alto today

It’s time to spend some time reflecting on the most important city in America: Palo Alto. It may be too late for Christmas, but it’s never too late to buy multiple copies of this book to share with your friends and family who don’t have the privilege of living in the Bay Area to help them understand how this important city came to being.

More importantly, perhaps this will inspire those people to move here, further driving up housing prices.

I for one cannot wait for the 2000-2020 version of this book. It’ll be a sure winner!

Just like how Palo Alto made Silicon Valley great, you can help make sure this site continues to be great! Click this link to learn more about donating to this site’s hosting costs!

Comments (2) -- Posted by: burbed @ 5:00 am

January 16, 2010

California Landlord’s Law Book: Evictions [David Brown]

California Landlord’s Law Book: Evictions (Paperback)
~ David Brown Attorney (Author)
Key Phrases: state bar, summary judgment, hearing date, Los Angeles, Code Civ, Pro Per (more…)
List Price:     $44.99
Price:     $29.69 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping. Details
You Save:     $15.30 (34%)

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Let’s face it – there’s no more noble calling that being a landlord in California. If it weren’t, then laws like Prop 13 wouldn’t reward landlords by providing them with amazingly low property taxes! Clearly, the citizens of the state have decided that more landlords is better from a social perspective.

And let’s face it, there’s nothing better about being a landlord than being able to evict a tenant. After all, it goes to show how powerful you are. You are the lord of the land, and you can do to the serfs whatever your will compels you to do. You should always be sure to conduct evictions while wearing your golden, jewel encrusted, crown that says “LANDLORD”.

You may need some help, and that’s where this book comes in.

When you’re not busy helping society by evicting people, you can help make sure this site continues to be great! Click this link to learn more about donating to this site’s hosting costs!

Comments (5) -- Posted by: burbed @ 5:10 am

January 9, 2010

California Real Estate Sales Exam

California Real Estate Sales Exam, 3rd Edition (Paperback)
~ LearningExpress Editors (Author)
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List Price:     $34.95
Price:     $24.05

 

The one-stop guide to the California Real Estate Salespersons Exam… To become a licensed real estate salesperson in California, you must first pass the California real estate salespersons exam. Each chapter of this revised and updated third edition not only covers what is needed to pass the test, but also includes information for success in a career as a real estate salesperson, as well as four full length practice exams with full answer explanations.

It’s a new year – isn’t it time you got a new job to match?

2010 is the year to become a real estate salesperson. Why? Because the market is set to take off! Just like it has been in 2008 and 2009. Tons of buyers are still sitting on the sidelines, waiting to storm in and grab all the houses they can.

I don’t know this for sure, but supposedly, the exams this year will cover topics like “Crowd management” “First aid” and “What to do if people start throwing money and gold at you for the house.” Better start studying!

After you get your new job and become amazingly rich, you can help make sure this site continues to be great! Click this link to learn more about donating to this site’s hosting costs!

Comments (4) -- Posted by: burbed @ 5:07 am

January 2, 2010

Miller and Starr California Real Estate Laws Annotated, 2010 ed.

Miller and Starr California Real Estate Laws Annotated, 2010 ed. (California Desktop Codes) (Paperback)

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~ West (Author)

$77.00 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping. Details

This product includes selected provisions from the California Constitution, plus a wide range of California codes, including Business and Professions, Civil, Civil Procedure, Commercial, Corporations, Education, Evidence, Family, Financial, Government, Harbors and Navigation, Health and Safety, Insurance, Labor, Penal, Probate, Public Contract, Public Resources, Public Utilities, Revenue and Taxation, Streets and Highways, Vehicle, Water, and Welfare and Institutions. It also contains selected regulations from titles 10 (Investment), 14 (Natural Resources), 16 (Professional and Vocational Regulations), 22 (Social Security), and 25 (Housing and Community Development) of the California Code of Regulations.

This is probably a real book. And it’s probably a real serious book.

But let’s face it, this is another clear example of why America is going down hill and becoming uncompetitive.

Do we really really need laws for real estate? Do we really need the same government that brought us all those disasters like the $1000 hammer to be on our backs, and dictate what we can do with our land?

If we do have laws, shouldn’t they be written by people who know real estate? Who have the smarts to figure out what the future should be like? Like the California Association of Realtors? Or mortgage brokers? Come on!

I think the tea baggers really need to come to California to free us of these punishing and restrictive laws. Let’s help real estate blossom. Let’s help freedom ring. Let’s end these laws today.

After you’re done protesting these laws, you can help make sure this site continues to be great! Click this link to learn more about donating to this site’s hosting costs!

Comments (6) -- Posted by: burbed @ 5:37 am

December 26, 2009

The Silicon Valley Edge: A Habitat for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Stanford Business Books) (Paperback)

~ Chong-Moon Lee (Editor), William Miller (Editor), Marguerite Hancock (Editor), Henry Rowen (Editor), William F. Miller (Author), Marguerite Gong Hancock (Author), Henry S. Rowen (Author)

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The editors (all connected with Stanford Universiy) use contributions from 25 authors, business professionals, and academics to trace the unique evolution of Silicon Valley from 1949 to the present. Focusing on the seminal importance of Stanford University, Hewlett-Packard, Fairchild Semiconductor, Xerox PARC, and Apple Computer, they provide an insider’s view of what makes Silicon Valley such a dynamic center of innovation. The essays consider key players and ten crucial features that have molded the region’s explosive growth, revealing the unique circumstances that help Valley organizations, communities, and workers respond to internal and external opportunities and threats. Against this backdrop, we learn of the many challenges Valley residents face today, including a structural shift from hardware to software, a slowdown in employment growth and profits, a declining quality of life, a shortage of skilled workers, and a rapidly expanding digital divide. This solid work is recommended for both academic and larger public libraries.DNorman B. Hutcherson, California State Univ., Bakersfield

All the time, people wonder “Why is Silicon Valley so awesome?” Now, obviously there’s the smart people, the great restaurants, the great night life (nola’s in palo alto?), the great shopping (Santana Row!), and the great abundance of Fry’s. And high housing costs ensuring people work their hardest.

But… there’s more! There’s the innovation. There’s the risk taking. There’s the riches. It’s what keeps attracting people from around to this humble valley (that just happens to be the best in the world). Learn more about the edge here, so you can understand why we’ll never lose it, why others can only dream of having it, and why this will ensure house prices continue to soar.

After you catch up on why Silicon Valley is great, you can help make sure this site continues to be great! Click this link to learn more about donating to this site’s hosting costs!

Comments (3) -- Posted by: burbed @ 5:00 am